Cree

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Cree

 (krē)
n. pl. Cree or Crees
1. A member of a Native American people inhabiting a large area from eastern Canada west to Alberta and the Great Slave Lake. Formerly located in central Canada, the Cree expanded westward and eastward in the 17th and 18th centuries, the western Cree adopting the Plains Indian life and the eastern Cree retaining their woodland culture.
2. The Algonquian language of the Cree.

[French Cris, shortening of Cristineaux, name of a 17th-century Cree band, from Ojibwa (Old Algonquin) kirištino·, from Cree.]

cree

(kriː)
n
(Games, other than specified) dialect South Wales and Southwest English temporary immunity from the rules of a game: said by children
[of unknown origin]

Cree

(kriː)
npl Cree or Crees
1. (Peoples) a member of a Native American people living in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Algonquian family
3. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) a syllabic writing system of this and certain other languages
[from first syllable of Canadian French Christianaux, probably based on Ojibwa Kenistenoag (tribal name)]

Cree

(kri)

n., pl. Crees, (esp. collectively) Cree.
1. a member of an American Indian people of subarctic Canada, living in scattered communities from Quebec W around the shore of Hudson Bay to Saskatchewan and Alberta.
2. the Algonquian language of the Cree.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cree - a member of an Algonquian people living in central CanadaCree - a member of an Algonquian people living in central Canada
Algonquian, Algonquin - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
2.Cree - the Algonquian language spoken by the Cree
Algonquian language, Algonquin, Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
Translations
kríjština
Cree
Kria lingvoKrio
criidioma cree
cree
krijski jezik
クリー語
krī valoda
Cree
cree
język kri
língua cree
cree
мова крі
References in periodicals archive ?
Interested storytellers still sit in their lodges, surrounded by a group of young men, relating the stirring deeds of that memorable day when the Cree Indians were subject to a terrible defeat.
With America's Pride, his team worked with the Navajos of New Mexico, the Cree Indians in Canada and the Canadian and British Governments on prevention.
We learn at the top of the piece, that the Cree Indians gave this name to the northern lights.
Pictures of mountains and rivers ravaged by mining companies should remind us of a quote from the Cree Indians of North America: 'Only when the last tree has died, the last river has been poisoned, the last fish has been caught, will we realize that we can't eat money.'
JT: Speaking of change, do you recall the Cree Indians?
"Over 90% of the Cree Indians still speak their native language - but it wouldn't surprise me if the languages of the Navajo, the Cherokee and the Lakota disappeared within the next quarter century.
Traditional Narratives of the Rock Cree Indians if for anyone who has a serious interest in learning more about the Rock Cree, their myths, legends and history through the stories and discussions presented in this book.
This first novel, based on the life of a famed Canadian sniper in WW I, is told mostly via a series of flashbacks by two Cree Indians. One, Niska, is an elderly medicine woman who lives in the forest.
David Williams' The Burning Wood (1975) is a novel of such conflicts between Man, Matter and Spirit; between Fundamentalist Puritanism m the form of Grandpa Cardiff and the vitriolic Auntie Bee, and the profane and marginalized nature's sons of the soil, the Cree Indians, forced to ape and adopt a white way of life.
THE Queen popped in for a pow wow with leaders of Canada's First Nation Cree Indians yesterday.
But even though Chief Papaschase and the others accepted scrip to feed themselves and supposedly extinguished their claims to treaty status, many of their descendents still looked, felt, and identified themselves as Cree Indians, had many close relatives on reserves close by who didn't appear to be any more Indian than themselves, and tried to put the band back together.