moss pink

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moss pink

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

moss pink

n
(Plants) a North American plant, Phlox subulata, forming dense mosslike mats: cultivated for its pink, white, or lavender flowers: family Polemoniaceae. Also called: ground pink or creeping phlox
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

moss′ pink′


n.
a phlox, Phlox subulata, of the eastern U.S., having showy pink to purple flowers.
[1855–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.moss pink - low wiry-stemmed branching herb or southern California having fringed pink flowersmoss pink - low wiry-stemmed branching herb or southern California having fringed pink flowers
phlox - any polemoniaceous plant of the genus Phlox; chiefly North American; cultivated for their clusters of flowers
genus Linanthus, Linanthus - a genus of herbs of the family Polemoniaceae; found in western United States
2.moss pink - low tufted perennial phlox with needlelike evergreen leaves and pink or white flowersmoss pink - low tufted perennial phlox with needlelike evergreen leaves and pink or white flowers; native to United States and widely cultivated as a ground cover
phlox - any polemoniaceous plant of the genus Phlox; chiefly North American; cultivated for their clusters of flowers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Creeping phlox self-seeds without restraint, so deadhead spent blooms to direct the plant's energy to producing denser growth, instead of scattering seed, and to encourage rebloom.
They are not fans of plants with fuzzy leaves, such as lamb's ear, or a strong odour, like creeping phlox. Ones with strap leaves, like lilyturf, or plants like mountain pine, with needles, are also not on their menu.
They are not fans of plants with fuzzy leaves, such as lamb's ear, strong odour, like creeping phlox. Ones with strap leaves, like lilyturf, or plants like mountain pine, with needles, are also not on their menu.
Maroon-Lango, "Identification of potexvirus isolates from creeping phlox and trailing portulaca as strains of Alternanthera mosaic virus, and comparison of the 3'-terminal portion of the viral genomes," Acta Horticulturae, vol.
Based on seasonal availability, plants could include: Wild Geranium, Large Beard-tongue, Foxglove Beardtongue, Fall Phlox, Sweet William, Creeping Phlox, Turk's Cap Lily, Swamp Milkweed (to host Monarch butterflies), New England aster, Switchgrass, Big Bluestem grass, Black-eyed Susan, Jewelweed, Woolly Ragwort, Blue Waxweed, Purple Tridens grass, spearmint, peppermint, oregano, and sage.
Bell; "Cycles, Ceremonies, and Creeping Phlox: An Autoethnographic Account of the Creation of Our Garden," by Kimberly J.
Some possibilities are cotoneasters (creeping, rockspray and thyme-leaved are a few of the many that can be used), Euonymus (green leaved, large or small, or golden or silver variegated are all good), "groundcover roses," low-bush blueberries, daylilies, true ivies (Hedera), creeping phlox and the double-flower types of violets.
Easter lilies, creeping phlox, petunias as full and round as peonies, irises, and foxgloves, their blooms spilling over the white fence, delight the eye at every turn.
Some of the plants you see in yards here all the time are actually native plants: Rhododendron, Azalea, Black-eyed Susan, American Holly, Redbud, Flowering Dogwood, Daylilies, Irises, Oak-leaf Hydrangea, Heuchera, Strawberries, Southern Magnolia, Creeping Phlox, and Tall Summer Phlox.
Available in white, pink, yellow, maroon, purple, violet and blue they are the perfect partner to harmonize with or add contrast to the spring ground cover of dwarf or creeping phlox (Phlox subulata) and rockcress (Arabis) (photo p.