creolist

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creolist

(ˈkriːəʊlɪst)
n
(Linguistics) a student of creole languages
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
This stimulating, challenging critique of traditional creolistics provides fresh insight into the complexity of the colonial world and the oft-forgotten role of subaltern societies.
Linguists in different specialties discuss complexity in the three major contact-related fields of creolistics, indigenization, and nativization.
The exact linguistic characteristics of this supposedly creolized or 'pidginized' speech is to date uncertain, due to the fact that Classic literary writers were generally untrained in linguistic analysis, and documentation from the time are scarce if not strictly nonexistent; so, most of such imitations are deemed by linguists dealing with Afro-Hispanic Creolistics to be inaccurate and untrustworthy (see, e.g., Lipski 2005a, b.).
The terms "Creole" and "creole language" refer to these languages, and the Caribbean area is indeed the paradise of creolistics: nowhere else in the world are such a large number of creole languages found, and they are spoken by almost everyone.
Undoubtedly, creolistics has an important bearing on the problem of Israeli.
Apart from the omissions noted above, many important studies have been overlooked, such as those on the early forms of broken English in the area, on creolistics, on sociolinguistics as applied to non-Western societies, and on attitudes and linguistic nationalism/identity research.
This jargon or "pidgin," as it came to be known in Pidgin and Creole linguistics or, recently, by its even more fashionable term "creolistics," later developed into a full-blown "creole" language with a fully developed grammar, lexicon, and phonology of its own.
Kubayanda is far from alone in the misuse of the term creole, but his assumption that the Caribbean Creoles can be defined as "Afro linguistic forms" (69) is simplistic even from the point of view of those linguists who defend the "substratist" school of creolistics, who show more subtly how some African linguistic habits were transferred to the New World, and who would find perplexing, to say the least, his assertion that the phonological peculiarities in Afro-Cuban were "transferred to al-Andalaus, especially Seville, during the Arab-African colonization of the Peninsula" (75).