Crete


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Crete

 (krēt)
An island of southeast Greece in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Its Minoan civilization, centered at the city of Knossos on the northern coast, was one of the earliest in the world and reached the height of its wealth and power c. 1600 bc. Crete subsequently fell to the Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Venetians, and Ottoman Turks. The islanders proclaimed their union with modern Greece in 1908.

Cre′tan adj. & n.

Crete

(kriːt)
n
(Placename) a mountainous island in the E Mediterranean, the largest island of Greece: of archaeological importance for the ruins of Minoan civilization. Pop: 601 131 (2001). Area: 8331 sq km (3216 sq miles). Modern Greek name: Kríti

Crete

(krit)

n.
a Greek island in the Mediterranean, SE of mainland Greece. 502,165; 3235 sq. mi. (8380 sq. km). Cap.: Canea.
Also called Candia.
Cre′tan, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Crete - the largest Greek island in the MediterraneanCrete - the largest Greek island in the Mediterranean; site of the Minoan civilization that reached its peak in 1600 BC
Labyrinth of Minos - a vast labyrinth built in Crete by Daedalus at the command of Minos in order to contain the Minotaur
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
Mediterranean, Mediterranean Sea - the largest inland sea; between Europe and Africa and Asia
Cretan - a native or inhabitant of Crete
Translations

Crete

[kriːt] NCreta f

Crete

[ˈkriːt] nCrète f

Crete

nKreta nt

Crete

[kriːt] nCreta
References in classic literature ?
have taken over the administration of Crete on normal lines; and tourists must go elsewhere to witness the"debates," "resolutions," and "popular movements" of the old days.
It seems that in the island of Crete there lived a certain dreadful monster, called a Minotaur, which was shaped partly like a man and partly like a bull, and was altogether such a hideous sort of a creature that it is really disagreeable to think of him.
There had been some few dances upon the undulating deck, I suspect, and some hearty bursts of laughter, and other such unseasonable merriment among the victims, before the high blue mountains of Crete began to show themselves among the far-off clouds.
But while the vessel flew faster and faster towards Crete, Theseus was astonished to behold a human figure, gigantic in size, which appeared to be striding, with a measured movement, along the margin of the island.
It was indeed the ancient abode of Proteus, the old shepherd of Neptune's flocks, now the Island of Scarpanto, situated between Rhodes and Crete.
Upon taking the course of the Nautilus, I found that we were going towards Candia, the ancient Isle of Crete.
Being disappointed, then, in his search for the king, Orion went away to Crete and spent his time hunting in company with Artemis and Leto.
But now in this hateful age of ours not one is safe, not though some new labyrinth like that of Crete conceal and surround her; even there the pestilence of gallantry will make its way to them through chinks or on the air by the zeal of its accursed importunity, and, despite of all seclusion, lead them to ruin.
But the people ought to be made one, and a community, as I have already said, by education; as property at Lacedsemon, and their public tables at Crete, were made common by their legislators.
Idomeneus, again, lost no men at sea, and all his followers who escaped death in the field got safe home with him to Crete.
Here he divided his fleet and took the one half towards Crete where the Cydonians dwell round about the waters of the river Iardanus.
Skirting along the north coast of Sicily, passing through the group of Aeolian Isles, in sight of Stromboli and Vulcania, both active volcanoes, through the Straits of Messina, with "Scylla" on the one hand and "Charybdis" on the other, along the east coast of Sicily, and in sight of Mount Etna, along the south coast of Italy, the west and south coast of Greece, in sight of ancient Crete, up Athens Gulf, and into the Piraeus, Athens will be reached in two and a half or three days.