crick


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Related to crick: crick in neck

crick 1

 (krĭk)
n.
A painful cramp or muscle spasm, as in the back or neck.
tr.v. cricked, crick·ing, cricks
To cause a painful cramp or muscle spasm in by turning or wrenching.

[Middle English crike.]

crick 2

 (krĭk)
n. Upper Northern & Western US
Variant of creek.. See Note at run.

crick

(krɪk)
n
(Physiology) a painful muscle spasm or cramp, esp in the neck or back
vb
(Physiology) (tr) to cause a crick in (the neck, back, etc)
[C15: of uncertain origin]

crick

(krɪk)
n
(Physical Geography) US and Canadian a dialect word for creek2

Crick

(krɪk)
n
(Biography) Francis Harry Compton. 1916–2004, English molecular biologist: helped to discover the helical structure of DNA; Nobel prize for physiology or medicine shared with James Watson and Maurice Wilkins 1962

crick1

(krɪk)

n.
1. a sharp, painful spasm of the muscles, as of the neck or back.
v.t.
2. to give a crick or wrench to (the neck, back, etc.).
[1400–50; late Middle English crikke, perhaps akin to crick2]

crick2

(krɪk)

n. Northern and Western U.S.

Crick

(krɪk)

n.
Francis Harry Compton, born 1916, English biophysicist: Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1962.

crick


Past participle: cricked
Gerund: cricking

Imperative
crick
crick
Present
I crick
you crick
he/she/it cricks
we crick
you crick
they crick
Preterite
I cricked
you cricked
he/she/it cricked
we cricked
you cricked
they cricked
Present Continuous
I am cricking
you are cricking
he/she/it is cricking
we are cricking
you are cricking
they are cricking
Present Perfect
I have cricked
you have cricked
he/she/it has cricked
we have cricked
you have cricked
they have cricked
Past Continuous
I was cricking
you were cricking
he/she/it was cricking
we were cricking
you were cricking
they were cricking
Past Perfect
I had cricked
you had cricked
he/she/it had cricked
we had cricked
you had cricked
they had cricked
Future
I will crick
you will crick
he/she/it will crick
we will crick
you will crick
they will crick
Future Perfect
I will have cricked
you will have cricked
he/she/it will have cricked
we will have cricked
you will have cricked
they will have cricked
Future Continuous
I will be cricking
you will be cricking
he/she/it will be cricking
we will be cricking
you will be cricking
they will be cricking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cricking
you have been cricking
he/she/it has been cricking
we have been cricking
you have been cricking
they have been cricking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cricking
you will have been cricking
he/she/it will have been cricking
we will have been cricking
you will have been cricking
they will have been cricking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cricking
you had been cricking
he/she/it had been cricking
we had been cricking
you had been cricking
they had been cricking
Conditional
I would crick
you would crick
he/she/it would crick
we would crick
you would crick
they would crick
Past Conditional
I would have cricked
you would have cricked
he/she/it would have cricked
we would have cricked
you would have cricked
they would have cricked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crick - a painful muscle spasm especially in the neck or back (`rick' and `wrick' are British)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
cramp, muscle spasm, spasm - a painful and involuntary muscular contraction
2.Crick - English biochemist who (with Watson in 1953) helped discover the helical structure of DNA (1916-2004)
Verb1.crick - twist (a body part) into a strained position; "crick your neck"
twist - turn in the opposite direction; "twist one's head"

crick

(Informal)
noun
1. spasm, cramp, convulsion, twinge I've got a crick in my neck from looking up at the screen.
verb
1. rick, jar, wrench I cricked my back from sitting in the same position for too long.
Translations

crick

[krɪk]
A. N to have a crick in one's neck/backtener tortícolis/lumbago
B. VT to crick one's necktener tortícolis
to crick one's backtener un ataque de lumbago

crick

[ˈkrɪk] n (in back)tour m de reins
to have a crick in one's neck → avoir un torticolis

crick

n a crick in one’s neck/backein steifes Genick/ein steifer Rücken
vt to crick one’s neck/backsich (dat)ein steifes Genick/einen steifen Rücken zuziehen

crick

[krɪk]
1. n crick in the necktorcicollo
crick in the back → dolore m alla schiena
2. vt to crick one's neckprendere il torcicollo
to crick one's back → farsi male alla schiena
References in classic literature ?
A sort of crick was in my neck as I gazed up to the two remaining horns; yes, two of them, one for Queequeg, and one for me.
Jim warn't on his island, so I tramped off in a hurry for the crick, and crowded through the willows, red-hot to jump aboard and get out of that awful country.
Jack's been heah; he say he reck'n you's ben shot, kase you didn' come home no mo'; so I's jes' dis minute a startin' de raf' down towards de mouf er de crick, so's to be all ready for to shove out en leave soon as Jack comes agin en tells me for certain you IS dead.
The majority of dairymen have a cross manner at milking time, but it happened that Mr Crick was glad to get a new hand--for the days were busy ones now--and he received her warmly; inquiring for her mother and the rest of the family--(though this as a matter of form merely, for in reality he had not been aware of Mrs Durbeyfield's existence till apprised of the fact by a brief business-letter about Tess).
She drank a little milk as temporary refreshment-- to the surprise--indeed, slight contempt--of Dairyman Crick, to whose mind it had apparently never occurred that milk was good as a beverage.
Well, as to going up into their horns," replied Dairyman Crick dubiously, as though even witchcraft might be limited by anatomical possibilities, "I couldn't say; I certainly could not.
When the milking was finished for the evening they straggled indoors, where Mrs Crick, the dairyman's wife--who was too respectable to go out milking herself, and wore a hot stuff gown in warm weather because the dairymaids wore prints--was giving an eye to the leads and things.
If this were one of those realistic Zolaesque stories I would describe the crick in the back that--but let us hurry on.
A more complete imagination than Philip's might have pictured a youth of splendid hope, for he must have been entering upon manhood in 1848 when kings, remembering their brother of France, went about with an uneasy crick in their necks; and perhaps that passion for liberty which passed through Europe, sweeping before it what of absolutism and tyranny had reared its head during the reaction from the revolution of 1789, filled no breast with a hotter fire.
In short, they were very often in his ears, and very often in his thoughts, but always in his good opinion; and he very often got such a crick in his neck by staring with his mouth wide open, at the steeple where they hung, that he was fain to take an extra trot or two, afterwards, to cure it.
I did get wet coming hither, and am sadly afraid that should I wade the water again I might get certain cricks and pains i' the joints that would mar my devotions for many a day to come.
The Francis Crick Institute (the Crick) is a biomedical discovery institute dedicated to understanding the scientific mechanisms of living things.