adultery

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a·dul·ter·y

 (ə-dŭl′tə-rē, -trē)
n. pl. a·dul·ter·ies
Consensual sexual intercourse between a married person and a person other than the spouse.

[Middle English, from Old French adultere, from Latin adulterium, from adulter, adulterer; see adulterate.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

adultery

(əˈdʌltərɪ)
n, pl -teries
(Law) voluntary sexual intercourse between a married man or woman and a partner other than the legal spouse
[C15: adulterie, altered (as if directly from Latin adulterium) from C14 avoutrie, via Old French from Latin adulterium, from adulter, back formation from adulterāre. See adulterate]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•dul•ter•y

(əˈdʌl tə ri)

n., pl. -ter•ies.
voluntary sexual intercourse between a married person and someone other than his or her lawful spouse.
[1325–75; Middle English a(d)vouterie < Old French avoutrie < Latin adulterium=adulter (adulterāre adulterate) + -ium -ium1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adultery - extramarital sex that willfully and maliciously interferes with marriage relationsadultery - extramarital sex that willfully and maliciously interferes with marriage relations; "adultery is often cited as grounds for divorce"
extramarital sex, free love - sexual intercourse between individuals who are not married to one another
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

adultery

noun unfaithfulness, infidelity, cheating (informal), fornication, playing the field (slang), extramarital sex, playing away from home (slang), illicit sex, unchastity, extramarital relations, extracurricular sex (informal), extramarital congress, having an affair or a fling She is going to divorce him on the grounds of adultery.
fidelity, chastity, faithfulness
Quotations
"It is not marriage but a mockery of it, a merging that mixes love and dread together like jackstraws" [Alexander Theroux An Adultery]
"Adultery is the application of democracy to love" [H.L. Mencken]
"The first breath of adultery is the freest; after it, constraints aping marriage develop" [John Updike Couples]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
زِنَى
cizoložství
ægteskabsbrudutroskab
preljub
házasságtörés
framhjáhald, hjúskaparbrot
svetimavimas
cudzoložstvo
hor

adultery

[əˈdʌltərɪ] Nadulterio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

adultery

[əˈdʌltəri] nadultère m
to commit adultery → commettre l'adultère
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

adultery

nEhebruch m; to commit adulteryEhebruch begehen; because of his adultery with three actressesweil er mit drei Schauspielerinnen Ehebruch begangen hatte
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

adultery

[əˈdʌltərɪ] nadulterio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

adultery

(əˈdaltəri) noun
sexual intercourse between a husband and a woman who is not his wife or between a wife and a man who is not her husband.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

adultery

n. adulterio.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
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