defamation

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Related to Criminal libel: slander, Defamatory libel

def·a·ma·tion

 (dĕf′ə-mā′shən)
n.
The act of defaming; calumny, slander, or libel.

de·fam′a·to′ry (dĭ-făm′ə-tôr′ē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

defamation

(ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃən)
n
1. (Law) law the injuring of a person's good name or reputation. Compare libel, slander
2. (Law) the act of defaming or state of being defamed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

def•a•ma•tion

(ˌdɛf əˈmeɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of defaming, esp. unjustified injury to another's reputation, as by slander or libel.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Medieval Latin]
de•fam•a•to•ry (dɪˈfæm əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.defamation - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actionsdefamation - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
assassination, blackwash, character assassination - an attack intended to ruin someone's reputation
malignment, smear, vilification - slanderous defamation
libel - a false and malicious publication printed for the purpose of defaming a living person
slander - words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
name calling, names - verbal abuse; a crude substitute for argument; "sticks and stones may break my bones but names can never hurt me"
epithet, name - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
2.defamation - an abusive attack on a person's character or good name
attack - strong criticism; "he published an unexpected attack on my work"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

defamation

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

defamation

noun
The expression of injurious, malicious statements about someone:
Law: libel.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
pomluva
ærekrenkelseærekrenking

defamation

[ˌdefəˈmeɪʃən] Ndifamación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

defamation

[ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃən] ndiffamation f
defamation of character → diffamation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

defamation

nDiffamierung f, → Verleumdung f; defamation of characterRufmord m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

defamation

[ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃn] n (frm) → diffamazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
"Panelo is showing the Filipino people that this country's criminal libel and cyberlibel laws are, more often than not, used as weapons wielded by the powerful to exact revenge and to punish than a legal remedy for justice,"NUJP said.
The Criminal Libel law came to replace the False Report Law, which was operational in the First Republic, where people risked, at least, five years jail without trial for saying or writing anything bad about the president and his government.
"His statement is premised on possible violation of law arising from wrongful accusations against the president, bordering on criminal libel, defamation and perjury," he added.
Others brought them for personal reasons - it was Oscar Wilde's pursuit of the Marquis of Queensberry for criminal libel that ultimately led to his unmasking as a homosexual, bankruptcy, and jail.
On another occasion, Kamau Ngotho, ever the cheeky investigative reporter, dug up some dirt on some powerful figure and there was an attempt to charge him with criminal libel.
Even in the European Union, journalists are still jailed for criminal libel and insulting the government, according to a 2014 International Press Institute study.
He told the Mirror: "I'm going to refer the documents [to investigators] to determine whether or not they have [committed] any criminal offences conspiracy to obstruct, obstruction, criminal fraud and criminal libel."
Lord Cardigan brought an action for criminal libel following the publication of Somerset John Gough Calthorpe's book, Letters from a Staff Officer in the Crimea.
Ghabash was charged with "criminal libel, forgery and fabrication of evidence of the crime of collaborating with Israel."
In the past, the state used criminal libel to punish journalists, but it was declared unconstitutional and nullified in February 2017.
on criminal libel against the President; 11.12 on Sedition and 11.14 on criminal malevolent.The instrument is under scrutiny by the Joint House Committee on Information, Broadcast, Culture and Tourism and Judiciary.Rep.
Kolawole is also demanding damages of N10 billion each from Fayose's spokesman, Lere Olayinka and a member of the state's House of Assembly for alleged criminal libel and defamation on a statement they allegedly made on a television and radio programme.