critical theory

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critical theory

n.
1. The field of study concerned with formulating and evaluating intellectual approaches to the analysis or interpretation of works of art, texts, and other cultural artifacts. Critical theory encompasses such theories as New Criticism, Marxism, structuralism, deconstruction, and postcolonial theory.
2. A collection of theories used to describe and analyze society and social norms, especially with the goal of enhancing the freedom of the individual while preserving social justice.
3. Any of these theories.
References in periodicals archive ?
8) In other words, the cracks within any social totality, in spite of sometimes a massive ideological effort to hide them away, allows a critical theorist to explain dialectical change towards another type of society (usually a more controlled one), but also to point towards the possibility of a real future emancipation.
The critical theorist Herbert Marcuse, for instance, says that technological domination in a capitalist system is the root cause of social and economic injustice.
Chriss writes about American sociologist and critical theorist Alvin Ward Gouldner (1920-80), the influences on his work, and his influence on the work of others.
A critical theorist, whether of the Frankfurt School or of the Social Reconstructionist type, on the other hand, repeatedly challenged the notion that method was ideologically neutral.
3 PAMELA Z, BAGGAGE ALLOWANCE (Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery, Bowling Green State University, Ohio) Critical theorist Fred Moten says of the role of voice in black resistance to slavery, "If the commodity could speak it would have intrinsic value, it would be infused with a certain spirit.
Then he went to study philosophy and sociology at the institute for social Research under critical theorist Max Horkhenimer and Theodor Adorno.
The self-contradiction involved is only self-evident when the critical theorist is skeptical about "norms" (a postmodernist view), but at the same time is "ethical", i.
Four common schools of thought in the curriculum arena are the linear, holistic, laissez-faire, and critical theorist approaches.
In chapter 15, the problems with high stakes testing are discussed from feminist and critical theorist standpoints and six recommendations are offered.
To quote critical theorist Guy Debord: "The spectator becomes the spectacle.
First, the so-called re-assessment of Adorno's work as a critical theorist is successful in large part due to Zuidervaart's reading of Adorno in light of questions from others.

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