Croatia


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Croatia

Cro·a·tia

 (krō-ā′shə)
A country of southern Europe along the northeast Adriatic coast. It was settled by Croats in the 7th century, became a kingdom in the 10th century, and reached the height of its power in the 11th century before being conquered by Hungary in 1091. After the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918, Croatia became a part of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, which later became Yugoslavia. Croatia declared its independence from Yugoslavia in 1991, triggering a period of warfare between ethnic Croats and ethnic Serbs that lasted until 1995. Zagreb is the capital and the largest city.

Croatia

(krəʊˈeɪʃə)
n
(Placename) a republic in SE Europe: settled by Croats in the 7th century; belonged successively to Hungary, Turkey, and Austria; formed part of Yugoslavia (1918–91); became independent in 1991 but was invaded by Serbia and fighting continued until 1995; involved in the civil war in Bosnia-Herzegovina (1991–95); joined the European Union in 2013. Language: Croatian. Religion: Roman Catholic majority. Currency: kuna. Capital: Zagreb. Pop: 4 475 611 (2013 est). Area: 55 322 sq km (21 359 sq miles). Croatian name: Hrvatska

Cro•a•tia

(kroʊˈeɪ ʃə, -ʃi ə)

n.
a republic in S Europe: includes the historical regions of Dalmatia, Istria, and Slavonia; formerly (1945–91) part of Yugoslavia. 4,676,865,; 21,835 sq. mi. (56,555 sq. km). Cap.: Zagreb.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Croatia - a republic in the western Balkans in south-central Europe in the eastern Adriatic coastal areaCroatia - a republic in the western Balkans in south-central Europe in the eastern Adriatic coastal area; formerly part of the Habsburg monarchy and Yugoslavia; became independent in 1991
Balkan Peninsula, Balkans - a large peninsula in southeastern Europe containing the Balkan Mountain Range
Dubrovnik, Ragusa - a port city in southwestern Croatia on the Adriatic; a popular tourist center
Split - an old Croatian city on the Adriatic Sea
Zagreb - the capital of Croatia
Croat, Croatian - a member of the Slavic people living in Croatia
Translations
Хърватска
Chorvatsko
Kroatien
KroatioKroatujo
Horvaatia
Kroatia
Hrvatska
Horvátország
Króatía
クロアチア
크로아티아
Kroatija
Croaţia
Hrvaška
Kroatien
ประเทศโครเอเชีย
nước Croatia

Croatia

[krəʊˈeɪʃə] NCroacia f

Croatia

[krəʊˈeɪʃə] nCroatie f
in Croatia → en Croatie

Croatia

nKroatien nt

Croatia

[krəʊˈeɪʃə] nCroazia

Croatia

كرواتيا Chorvatsko Kroatien Kroatien Κροατία Croacia Kroatia Croatie Hrvatska Croazia クロアチア 크로아티아 Kroatië Kroatia Chorwacja Croácia Хорватия Kroatien ประเทศโครเอเชีย Hırvatistan nước Croatia 克罗地亚
References in periodicals archive ?
If Croatia were to win it, Eduardo's star would rise even higher.
Against Spain and Italy, Croatia will play it tight with Tomislav Dujmovic and Darijo Srna employed in midfield for exactly that reason.
Under insistence by France and the Netherlands, the EU leaders agreed that Croatia will be monitored up to its accession in problem areas, i.
BRUSSELS: The European Commission is set to recommend Friday that EU member states finalize accession talks with Croatia, clearing an important hurdle on Zagreb's path to joining the 27-strong bloc, a source said.
Croatia Airlines' Airbus A319 passenger jet arrived in Istanbul Wednesday carrying Turkish and Croatian flags.
But Croatia quickly found their feet and Kranjcar opened the scoring with a well-struck penalty after a foul by Blackpool's Dekel Keinan's.
Adria had made a series of unfounded and exaggerated claims against Croatia and demanded compensation in excess of E80 million," said a press release by Latham & Watkins.
The lawsuit was a reaction to charges filed more than ten years ago by Croatia, which the ICJ in 2008 decided that it would hear.
Croatia has made tremendous political and economic progress over the past 15 years,' said Orsalia Kalantzopoulos, the World Bank's Croatia country director.
Keywords: Croatia, eGovernment, e-Croatia 2007 programme
There has been no shortage of scams in the world of commercial crime in Croatia but the country, despite an unemployment rate of 22% and per capita income of US$8,000 (according to the World Bank)--which indicates there would be a motivation to indulge in corruption and scams--has some cause to feel maligned.
Believe it or not, the normally efficient Germans have sent out thousands of flags and guidebooks featuring the wrong flag for Croatia.