crocodile

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croc·o·dile

 (krŏk′ə-dīl′)
n.
1. Any of various large aquatic reptiles of the family Crocodylidae that are native to tropical and subtropical regions and have thick, armorlike skin and long tapering jaws.
2. A crocodilian reptile, such as an alligator, caiman, or gharial.
3. Leather made from crocodile skin.
4. Chiefly British A line of people, especially pupils or choir members, standing two abreast.

[Middle English cocodril, from Old French, from Latin cocodrillus, variant of crocodīlus, from Greek krokodīlos : krokē, pebble + drīlos, circumcised man, worm.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

crocodile

(ˈkrɒkəˌdaɪl)
n
1. (Animals) any large tropical reptile, such as C. niloticus (African crocodile), of the family Crocodylidae: order Crocodilia (crocodilians). They have a broad head, tapering snout, massive jaws, and a thick outer covering of bony plates
2. (Animals) any other reptile of the order Crocodilia; a crocodilian
3. (Tanning)
a. leather made from the skin of any of these animals
b. (as modifier): crocodile shoes.
4. informal Brit a line of people, esp schoolchildren, walking two by two
[C13: via Old French, from Latin crocodīlus, from Greek krokodeilos lizard, ultimately from krokē pebble + drilos worm; referring to its fondness for basking on shingle]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

croc•o•dile

(ˈkrɒk əˌdaɪl)

n.
1. any of various narrow-snouted crocodilians of the genus Crocodylus and related genera, found mainly in tropical waters of both hemispheres.
2. any reptile of the order Crocodylia; crocodilian.
3. the tanned skin or hide of these reptiles.
[1250–1300; Middle English cocodrille < Medieval Latin cocodrilus, Latin crocodīlus < Greek krokódeilos crocodile, orig. a kind of lizard, said to be =krók(ē) pebble + -o- -o- + drîlos, dreîlos worm]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

croc·o·dile

(krŏk′ə-dīl′)
Any of various large, meat-eating, aquatic reptiles native to tropical and subtropical regions. Crocodiles have longer and slenderer jaws than alligators, and their teeth are visible when they close their jaws.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Crocodile

 a long line of persons or things, c. 1870.
Example: a crocodile of schoolgirls.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crocodile - large voracious aquatic reptile having a long snout with massive jaws and sharp teeth and a body covered with bony platescrocodile - large voracious aquatic reptile having a long snout with massive jaws and sharp teeth and a body covered with bony plates; of sluggish tropical waters
crocodilian, crocodilian reptile - extant archosaurian reptile
Crocodilus, Crocodylus, genus Crocodilus, genus Crocodylus - type genus of the Crocodylidae
African crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus, Nile crocodile - a dangerous crocodile widely distributed in Africa
Asian crocodile, Crocodylus porosus - estuarine crocodile of eastern Asia and Pacific islands
Morlett's crocodile - a variety of crocodile
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
krokodil
تمساحتِمْساحتـِمْسَاح
krokodýl
krokodille
krokodilo
krokotiili
krokodil
krokodil
krókódíll
ワニ
악어
crocodilus
krokodilaskrokodilo ašaros
krokodils
krokodíl
krokodil
krokodil
mamba
จระเข้
крокодил
cá sấu

crocodile

[ˈkrɒkədaɪl]
A. Ncocodrilo m
to walk in a crocodileandar en doble fila
B. CPD crocodile tears NPL (fig) → lágrimas fpl de cocodrilo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

crocodile

[ˈkrɒkədaɪl]
n
(= animal) → crocodile m
(= line) [people, vehicles] → rang m par deux
modif [handbag, shoes] → en crocodile, en croco; [skin] → de crocodile crocodile clip, crocodile-infestedcrocodile clip npince f crocodilecrocodile-infested [ˈkrɒkədaɪlɪnfɛstɪd] adjinfesté(e) de crocodilescrocodile tears [ˈkrɒkədaɪltɪərz] npllarmes fpl de crocodile
to shed crocodile tears, to weep crocodile tears → verser des larmes de crocodile
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

crocodile

n
Krokodil nt
(Brit Sch) to walk in a crocodilezwei und zwei hintereinandergehen; the long crocodile of little girlsder lange Zug kleiner Mädchen, die zwei und zwei hintereinandergehen

crocodile

:
crocodile clip
nKrokodilklemme f
crocodile tears
plKrokodilstränen pl; to shed crocodileKrokodilstränen vergießen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

crocodile

[ˈkrɒkədaɪl] ncoccodrillo
to walk in a crocodile (Brit) (fam) → camminare in fila per due
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

crocodile

(ˈkrokədail) noun
a large reptile found in the rivers of Asia, Africa, South America and northern Australia.
crocodile tears
pretended tears of grief.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

crocodile

تـِمْسَاح krokodýl krokodille Krokodil κροκόδιλος cocodrilo krokotiili crocodile krokodil coccodrillo ワニ 악어 krokodil krokodille krokodyl crocodilo крокодил krokodil จระเข้ timsah cá sấu 鳄鱼
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
He knew more of the language of crocodiles than did any man.
"I have often," said Smee, "noticed your strange dread of crocodiles."
As the ape-man reached the surface he saw the heads of two great crocodiles but a short distance from him.
Here is neither boat nor bridge, and the river is so full of hippopotami, or river-horses, and crocodiles, that it is impossible to swim over without danger of being devoured.
"Ha!" said Joe, "blacks instead of crocodiles! Well, I prefer it as it is; but how in the mischief dare these fellows go in bathing in such places?"
As she swam, her mind, filled with the terrors of the night, conjured recollection of the stories she had heard of the fierce crocodiles which infest certain of the rivers of Borneo.
It is the wisdom of crocodiles, that shed tears when they would devour.
I had been reading to Peggotty about crocodiles. I must have read very perspicuously, or the poor soul must have been deeply interested, for I remember she had a cloudy impression, after I had done, that they were a sort of vegetable.
And another time, when the circus came to Puddleby, the crocodile who had a bad tooth- ache escaped at night and came into the Doctor's garden.
"And one day when we was in Outland, oo know--before we came to Fairyland me and Sylvie took him a big Crocodile. And he shortened it up for us.
they deified the crocodile of the nile, because the crocodile is tongueless; and the Sperm Whale has no tongue, or as least it is so exceedingly small, as to be incapable of protrusion.
look!" Joan cried in a low voice, pointing across the narrow stream to a slack eddy where a huge crocodile drifted like a log awash.