crozier

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cro·zier

 (krō′zhər)
n.
Variant of crosier.

crozier

(ˈkrəʊʒə)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a variant spelling of crosier

cro•sier

or cro•zier

(ˈkroʊ ʒər)

n.
1. a ceremonial staff carried by a bishop or an abbot, hooked at one end like a shepherd's crook. See illus. at cope 2.
2. the coiled tip of a plant part, as a fern frond.
[1350–1400; short for crosier-staff; Middle English crocer staff-bearer < Anglo-French (Middle French crossier). See crosse, -er2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.crozier - a staff surmounted by a crook or cross carried by bishops as a symbol of pastoral officecrozier - a staff surmounted by a crook or cross carried by bishops as a symbol of pastoral office
staff - a rod carried as a symbol
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Enter the CARDINALS and BISHOPS, some bearing crosiers, some
In the centre of this crowd, the grand officers of the Brotherhood of Fools bore on their shoulders a litter more loaded down with candles than the reliquary of Sainte-Geneviève in time of pest; and on this litter shone resplendent, with crosier, cope, and mitre, the new Pope of the Fools, the bellringer of Notre-Dame, Quasimodo the hunchback.
It was, then, not without surprise and alarm, that at the very moment when Quasimodo was passing the Pillar House, in that semi-intoxicated state, a man was seen to dart from the crowd, and to tear from his hands, with a gesture of anger, his crosier of gilded wood, the emblem of his mock popeship.
The Crosiers approved the revisions and came to testify at the Statehouse with 12-yearold son Sean.
For the Crosiers, an international order founded in the early 13th century, the past 15 years have been ones of reflection and change as they consolidated from eight to two communities in the interest of strengthening their community life of intentional prayer and service, said Donnay.
In this wide-ranging book brimming with new research, Michael Hayden examines a little known group of monastic churchmen: the Crosiers.
The items on display included reliquaries, ivory and silver crosiers, the seal of the Cathedral Chapter, and elaborate chalices and patens.
Then, in order of seniority, all the Bishops of Canada presented their crosiers at the feet of the statue.
Their topics include complexity of meaning at Dysert O'Dea, early Gothic architecture in the Archdioceses of Cashel, Holycross and the language of Irish Late Gothic, the tower houses of County Limerick, at the uttermost ends of the earth, and a tale of two crosiers.