saltire

(redirected from Cross of St. Andrew)
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Related to Cross of St. Andrew: Crux decussata
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saltire

sal·tire

 (sôl′tîr′, -tīr′, săl′-)
n. Heraldry
An ordinary in the shape of a Saint Andrew's cross, formed by the crossing of a bend and a bend sinister.

[Middle English sautour, from Old French saultoir, stile, from saulter, to jump, from Latin saltāre; see saltation.]

saltire

(ˈsɔːlˌtaɪə) or less commonly

saltier

n
(Heraldry) heraldry an ordinary consisting of a diagonal cross on a shield
[C14 sawturoure, from Old French sauteour cross-shaped barricade, from saulter to jump, from Latin saltāre]

sal•tire

(ˈsæl tɪr, -taɪər, ˈsɔl-)

n.
a heraldic charge formed by the crossing of a bend and a bend sinister.
[1350–1400; < Middle French sautoir crossed jumping bar < Medieval Latin saltātōrium]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.saltire - a cross resembling the letter x, with diagonal bars of equal lengthsaltire - a cross resembling the letter x, with diagonal bars of equal length
Cross - a representation of the structure on which Jesus was crucified; used as an emblem of Christianity or in heraldry
References in periodicals archive ?
George, adopted as an English symbol by King Richard the Lionheart in the 12th century after he is said to have seen it in a vision during the Third Crusade; and from the white cross of St. Andrew, which was used in Scotland against a blue background after King Angus reported a similar saintly vision in 832 A.D.
After all, you don't hear of Scottish Nationalists clamouring for the cross of St. Andrew to be removed from the flag!
And Queen's University still displays the cross of St. Andrew.