crownland


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

crownland

(ˈkraʊnˌlænd)
n
(Historical Terms) a large administrative division of the former empire of Austria-Hungary
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Austrian crownland of Galicia was larger; its western territories were incorporated into Poland after World War II.
She also called the Siamese king an 'usurper of the Crownland, a rascal, murderer, and traitor'.
Similarly, while Poles feature more prominently than Jews, no chapter deals specifically with their experience of Galicia as an Austrian crownland.
Early female activists of KKOL (including Dziubinska) and the Society of Secret Instruction (including its founder, Cecylia Sniego cka) eventually joined the nationalist umbrella educational organization, the Society of National Education (TON--Towarzystwo Oswiaty Narodowej), as well as its women's organization, the Circle of Women of the Crownland and Lithuania (Kolo Kobiet Korony i Litwy).
After the father's early death in 1860, the family moved to Czernowitz, the capital of the crownland Bukovina, an eastern outpost of the Habsburg empire that sported a sophisticated Jewish population with an active cultural life in Yiddish, Hebrew, and German.
If it is indeed of Galician origin, I surmise that the word "Holodomor" arose under the influence of a satirical name for the old Austrian crownland, known in German as Galizien und Lodomerien; wags renamed it Golicja i Glodomeria, which in Polish signifies a place where people go naked and die of hunger.
To understand the mind of those who live in the veiled, history-bound, intellectually suicidal Crownlands of Cannonia, a country rising from foggy, boggy Marchlands upon which bloody stalemates were fought, one must follow two lines of thought.
The ZPwK was established in Toronto in 1924 as a local organization amalgamating three Toronto-based organizations: Synowie Polski (the "Society of the Brotherly Aid of the Sons of Poland, under the Protection of the Holy Mother of Czcstochowa, the Queen of the Polish Crownlands," est.
His book deals with the negotiations associated with the unsuccessful attempt by the Czech nobility and growing middle class to secure a federalized Habsburg monarchy with the Crownlands of Bohemia, Moravia, and Silesia, thus becoming an equal partner with Austria and Hungary, changing the structure of the empire from a dualist to a trialist one.