cubic yard

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Noun1.cubic yard - a unit of volume (as for sand or gravel)cubic yard - a unit of volume (as for sand or gravel)
References in classic literature ?
[2] The myriameter is equal to rather more than 10,936 cubic yards English.
Its area measures 6,032 feet; and its contents about 1,500 cubic yards; that is to say, when completely immersed it displaces 50,000 feet of water, or weighs 1,500 tons.
This was the flour, the infinitesimal trace of it scattered through thousands of cubic yards of snow.
The current contract will allow for approximately 234,000 cubic yards to be dredged from Buffalo Harbor throughout the Buffalo River and the mouth of the ship canal.
Reportedly, this project features 20,000 cubic yards of structural concrete, 40,000 cubic yards of concrete paving, 35,000 tons of asphalt, and 1.1 million cubic yards of earthwork.
That plan fell about 100,000 cubic yards of clean soil short of the goal for 2018.
The $148,000 work will expand the 15,000-cubic-yard retention pond to 21,000 cubic yards to accommodate unusual storm events with excessive precipitation, airport spokesman Sean Briggs said.
Granite's scope of work includes demolition of over 80,000 cubic yards of existing portland cement concrete and asphalt surfaces, demolition of over 13,000 feet of existing utilities, over 350,000 cubic yards of mass grading, structural excavation and backfill, and installation of over 28,000 feet of new domestic and fire water, storm drain, sanitary sewer, and natural gas utilities, along with nearly 3,000 cubic yards of utility structures including the construction of five pump stations.
To date, about 2.5 million cubic yards of sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been removed.
The report, published July 16, said the 42 landfills in Illinois reported receiving more than 45 million gate cubic yards of waste in 2013.
KOBELCO's SK17SR boasts a maximum digging depth of 7 feet 1 inch, a bucket digging force of 3,420 pounds and a bucket capacity of .058 cubic yards. Auxiliary hydraulics, pattern changers and a dozer blade are standard equipment with this model.
The present phase calls for putting 5.2 million cubic yards of waste into the existing footprint beginning in 2007, said David Murphy, vice president with town consultant Tighe & Bond, who agreed with Casella's projections.