cudden

cudden

(ˈkʌdən)
n
1. (Animals) dialect Scot a coalfish
2. obsolete a clown or dolt
References in periodicals archive ?
I certainly wasn't but my ambition to be an actress was acknowledged and nurtured by my wonderful drama teacher Terry Cudden and my parents.
Elsewhere, Eamon Barry, the former Meath manager who lasted just one year in the job after succeeding Sean Boylan in 2006, has been nominated for the coaching officer's role along with incumbent PJ Cudden.
Peter Amory is a dastardly Sir Percival Glyde, a touch of dottiness is provided by Glyn Grain as the wheelchair-bound Frederick Fairlie and the younger members of the cast, Thomas Brownlee, Isla Carter and Lucy Cudden, also acquit themselves well.
Cudden, "aesthetics signifies something which pertains to the criticism of the beautiful or to the theory of taste".
The largest coalfish were called cuddeen (otherwise cudden and cudding), according to two older men and the same number of middle-aged female informants.
Pat Cudden, Chairman of West Derwentside Credit Union, added: "The new credit union will cover a much larger area and rather than it being restricted to Derwentside it will cover all Durham.
Cudden in his Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory (Penguin Books), credited as Pessoa's creation.
THE STARS: Simon Callow, Kal Weber, Lucy Cudden, John Shrapnel.
Lacey Cudden, 17, from Birkenhead, is training to be a mechanical fitter on ships' engines and joined fellow apprentices at the famous yard's latest induction.
Sales and marketing director Claire Cudden said: "Our aim now is to become number one in every European country we supply by the end of 2007.