Cultural Revolution


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Cultural Revolution

n.
A comprehensive reform movement in China initiated by Mao Zedong in 1966 to eliminate counterrevolutionary elements in the country's institutions and leadership. It was characterized by political zealotry, purges of intellectuals, and social and economic chaos.

Cultural Revolution

n
(Historical Terms) (in China) a mass movement (1965–68), in which the youthful Red Guard played a prominent part. It was initiated by Mao Tse-tung to destroy the power of the bureaucrats and to revolutionize the attitudes and behaviour of the people. Also called: Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution

Cul′tural Revolu′tion


n.
a political movement in China (1966–69) launched by Mao Zedong to restore revolutionary zeal.
[translation of Chinese wénhuà gémìng]

Cultural Revolution

1965–68 A Chinese youth-led mass movement inspired by Mao Zedong to change popular ideology. It wrecked many lives and cultural institutions.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cultural Revolution - a radical reform in China initiated by Mao Zedong in 1965 and carried out largely by the Red Guard; intended to eliminate counterrevolutionary elements in the government it resulted in purges of the intellectuals and socioeconomic chaos
revolution - a drastic and far-reaching change in ways of thinking and behaving; "the industrial revolution was also a cultural revolution"
Cathay, China, Communist China, mainland China, People's Republic of China, PRC, Red China - a communist nation that covers a vast territory in eastern Asia; the most populous country in the world
References in periodicals archive ?
ANZ Bank (NYSE: ANZ) chief executive, Shayne Elliott, said on Monday that the bank needs to undergo a cultural revolution if it is to remain as one of the largest lenders in the nation.
By 1981, the Chinese Communist Party had disowned the Cultural Revolution, passing a resolution which while still acclaiming Mao as a pioneering genius, condemned this particular 'revolution' as an error for whose horrors the 'Gang of Four' - Mao's wife Jiang Qing and her three closest aides - were mainly responsible.
By 1969, China had spun so out of control that a new phase of the Cultural Revolution was launched.
Ji's worst scars from his Cultural Revolution ordeal were psychological rather than physical.
Yet instead of recoiling from the ideology and organization that tore apart his family and his country, Xi has adopted the key tenets and tools of the Cultural Revolution as his own.
For many historians, witnesses, and political activists, it's an appropriate time to analyze and reflect on the Cultural Revolution and remember the many lessons to be learned from it.
Some books and films - especially in the 1980s and '90s - did address the fallout of the Cultural Revolution, which saw homes, historic and religious sites ransacked, children turned against parents and some 16 million young people sent to the countryside for years to "learn from the peasants.
Chinese media coverage of RDW's anniversary provides insight into how contemporary Chinese state nationalism and social memory of the Cultural Revolution are constructed through rhetorical reconfigurations of China's past.
3) For example, Zhao exemplifies a strong work ethic typical of many Chinese who experienced the hardships of the Cultural Revolution.
Yiching Wu offers a revisionist history of the core years of China's Cultural Revolution (1966-69) based on three case studies.
In contrast to this, Croll depicted the Chinese feminist movement as occurring broadly within a nationalist and socialist context, which she examined from the late 19th century to the time of the Cultural Revolution (1) by analyzing various materials including Western testimonies, classical Chinese documents, memoirs, periodicals, and interviews.

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