curate

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Related to Curates: curate's egg, eminence

cu·rate 1

 (kyo͝or′ĭt)
n.
1. A cleric, especially one who has charge of a parish.
2. A cleric who assists a rector or vicar.

[Middle English curat, from Medieval Latin cūrātus, from Late Latin cūra, spiritual charge, from Latin, care; see cure.]

cu·rate 2

 (kyo͝or′āt′)
tr.v.
1. To organize and oversee (an art exhibit or film festival, for example).
2. To gather and present to the public: a blog that curates news stories.

[Back-formation from curator.]

cu·ra′tion (kyo͝or-ā′shən) n.

curate

(ˈkjʊərɪt)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a clergyman appointed to assist a parish priest
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a clergyman who has the charge of a parish (curate-in-charge)
3. Irish an assistant barman
[C14: from Medieval Latin cūrātus, from cūra spiritual oversight, cure]

curate

(kjʊəˈreɪt)
vb
1. (Art Terms) (tr) to be in charge of selecting, arranging, and presenting material (for an art exhibition or museum)
2. (tr) to be in charge of organizing, arranging, and presenting a festival or other event: The festival was curated by the films' directors..
[C20: back formation from curator]
cuˈration n

cu•rate

(ˈkyʊər ɪt)

n.
1. a cleric assisting a rector or vicar.
2. a cleric in charge of a parish.
[1300–50; Middle English curat (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin cūrātus= Latin cūr(a) care + -ātus -ate1]
cu′rate•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.curate - a person authorized to conduct religious worshipcurate - a person authorized to conduct religious worship; "clergymen are usually called ministers in Protestant churches"
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
ministrant - someone who serves as a minister
Translations
كاهِن مُعاوِن
vikář
hjælpepræstkapellan
Hilfspfarrerkuratieren
segédlelkész
aîstoîarprestur
pastoriaus padėjėjasvikaras
mācītāja palīgs

curate

[ˈkjʊərɪt] N (= parish priest) → cura m; (= assistant) → coadjutor m
to be like the curate's egg it's like the curate's egg (Brit) → tiene su lado bueno y su lado malo

curate

[ˈkjʊərɪt] nvicaire m

curate

n (Catholic) → Kurat m; (Protestant) → Vikar(in) m(f); it’s like the curate’s egges ist streckenweise gar nicht so schlecht

curate

[ˈkjʊərɪt] ncurato, cappellano

curate

(ˈkjuərət) noun
a clergyman in the Church of England assisting a rector or vicar.
References in classic literature ?
The Count de Villeroy said that "he did not know how any fear could be entertained for a moment, when the court had, to defend itself against the parliament and the citizens of Paris, his holiness the coadjutor, who by a signal could raise an army of curates, church porters and vergers."
When once more alone Gondy sent to summon all the curates with whom he had any connection to his house.
"And you, sir?" continued Gondy, turning to the curate of St.
In the first book I have wandered so much from my own adventures to tell of the experiences of my brother that all through the last two chapters I and the curate have been lurking in the empty house at Halliford whither we fled to escape the Black Smoke.
A Martian came across the fields about midday, laying the stuff with a jet of superheated steam that hissed against the walls, smashed all the windows it touched, and scalded the curate's hand as he fled out of the front room.
There the curate crouched, weeping silently, and refusing to stir again.
"With the curate of Montdidier and the superior of the Jesuits of Amiens."
At his right hand was placed the superior of the Jesuits, and on his left the curate of Montdidier.
Monsieur the Principal of Amiens, Monsieur the Curate of Montdidier, and I are arguing certain theological questions in which we have been much interested; I shall be delighted to have your opinion."
When it was what seemed to him the proper time he entered the village and went to Don Quixote's house, which he found all in confusion, and there were the curate and the village barber, who were great friends of Don Quixote, and his housekeeper was saying to them in a loud voice, "What does your worship think can have befallen my master, Senor Licentiate Pero Perez?" for so the curate was called; "it is three days now since anything has been seen of him, or the hack, or the buckler, lance, or armour.
"So say I too," said the curate, "and by my faith to-morrow shall not pass without public judgment upon them, and may they be condemned to the flames lest they lead those that read to behave as my good friend seems to have behaved."
"So, so!" said the curate, "are there giants in the dance?