Cusanus


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Cusanus

(kjuːˈseɪnəs)
n
(Biography) Nicholas. See Nicholas of Cusa
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Again, the issue does not confine itself to the historical moment in question, but has a more ample pertinence, as we know, for example, that the first bud of strictly modern infinity, Nicolaus Cusanus' idea of coincidentia oppositorum, which had flashed in the mind of the cardinal during his sea travel (in the winter of 1437-38) back from Greece (Cusanus 2002:100), where he had made serious efforts towards reunification of the Western and Eastern Church, revealed itself to have in addition to the schismatic background also an obvious connotation of harmonizing the two great Greek thinkers (Blum and Damschen 2006:XXX-XXXI).
Pluralitat und Rationalitat: Die Herausforderung der Vernunfi durch religiose und kulturelle Vielfalt nach Nikolaus Cusanus. Theologic und Frieden 32.
Theosis, the Neoplatonic term for the culmination of human existence as understood by Nicholas of Cusa (1401-1464), serves Nancy Hudson as the pivotal point for a multifaceted presentation of the thought of Cusanus. Before taking up the Cusan teaching on divine theophany (which is one side of the divine self-manifestation within creation, since all creatures represent an already realized deification), H.
The historian Will Durant called him "the most complete Christian of his time" and claimed that "had there been more such Nicholases there might have been no Luther." So Cusanus's ecumenical credentials are of the first order.
(73.) Es significativo que Alvarez Gomez emplee los mismos calificativos para referirse a Cusa y a Segovia: <<Er [Segovia] hat also ein uneingeschranktes Vertrauen zur Fahigkeit der ratio>>; <<Bei Cusanus stellen wir ebenso ein uneingeschranktes Vertrauen zum Intellekt fest>>: Mariano ALVAREZ GOMEZ, Uber die Bedingungen des Friedens im Glauben bei Johannes von Segovia undNikolaus von Kues, cit.
This public notice has itself brought new inquiries about Cusanus, the Renaissance man.
5:3; in another place, he refers to the docta ignorantia of Nicolas Cusanus: La nueva inocencia, Estella, Verbo Divino, 1993, for instance pp.34f.
Nicholas Cusanus, Copernicus, Bruno, Kepler, Galileo, Gassendi, Descartes, Boyle and Newton are usually taken as the major figures in the birth of modern science.
(On the philosophical and historical significance of Nicholas, see Cassirer, Dupre, and Koyre.) At the beginning of English Literature in the Sixteenth Century (1954), Lewis refers to Cusanus as "an early believer (for his own, metaphysical, reasons) in earth's movement" and he then goes on to discuss the advent of scientific methodology and the triumph of dualism: "By reducing Nature to her mathematical elements it substituted a mechanical for a genial or animistic conception of the universe.
Each of her five subjects - Petrarch, Cusanus, Valla, Machiavelli, and Montaigne - undertook a profoundly original rethinking of the basis for understanding, belief, and communication.