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Any of a group of organic compounds, occurring abundantly in plants, that yield a sugar and one or more nonsugar substances on hydrolysis.

[glycose, a monosaccharide (variant of glucose) + -ide.]

gly′co·sid′ic (-sĭd′ĭk) adj.


(Chemistry) any of a group of substances, such as digitoxin, derived from monosaccharides by replacing the hydroxyl group by another group. Many are important medicinal drugs. See also glucoside
glycosidic adj


(ˈglaɪ kəˌsaɪd)

any of the class of compounds that yield a sugar and an aglycon upon hydrolysis.
[1925–30; alter. of glucoside, with y from glyco-]
gly`co•sid′ic (-ˈsɪd ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glycoside - a group of compounds derived from monosaccharides
organic compound - any compound of carbon and another element or a radical
glucoside - a glycoside derived from glucose
nucleoside - a glycoside formed by partial hydrolysis of a nucleic acid
strophanthin - a bitter and very toxic glycoside derived from plants of the genus Strophanthus; in moderate doses it is a cardiac stimulant but in larger doses it is a powerful poison; used in Africa as an arrow poison


, glycoside
n. glucósido, compuesto natural o sintético que al hidrolizarse libera azúcar.
References in periodicals archive ?
Elderberry is generally a non-toxic plant however it contains cyanogenic glycosides that are converted to hydrogen cyanide during digestion; the consumption of immature plants or high quantities of fruits may cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea.
The stems, leaves, and seeds of apples, cherries, peaches, and apricots contain cyanogenic glycosides that can cause vomiting and loss of appetite when eaten in large amounts.
The cyanogenic glycosides linamarin and lotaustralin are known to be precursor compounds to the liberation of HCN on hydrolysis in cassava tissues.