cyclone

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cy·clone

 (sī′klōn′)
n.
1. Meteorology
a. An atmospheric system characterized by the rapid inward circulation of air masses about a low-pressure center, usually accompanied by stormy, often destructive weather. Cyclones circulate counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.
b. A violent tropical storm, especially one originating in the southwestern Pacific Ocean or Indian Ocean.
2. A violent rotating windstorm, especially a tornado.
3. Any of various devices using centrifugal force to separate materials.

[From Greek kuklōn, present participle of kukloun, to rotate, from kuklos, circle; see kwel- in Indo-European roots.]

cy·clon′ic (-klŏn′ĭk), cy·clon′i·cal adj.

cyclone

(ˈsaɪkləʊn)
n
1. (Physical Geography) another name for depression6
2. (Physical Geography) a violent tropical storm; hurricane
[C19: from Greek kuklōn a turning around, from kukloun to revolve, from kuklos wheel]
cyclonic, cyˈclonical, ˈcyclonal adj
cyˈclonically adv

Cyclone

(ˈsaɪkləʊn)
adj
(Agriculture) trademark Austral and NZ (of fencing) made of interlaced wire and metal

cy•clone

(ˈsaɪ kloʊn)

n.
1. a large-scale atmospheric wind-and-pressure system characterized by low pressure at its center and by circular wind motion, counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere, clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere.
2. (not in technical use) a tornado.
3. a device for removing small or powdered solids from air, water, or other gases or liquids by centrifugal force.
cy•clon′ic (-ˈklɒn ɪk) adj.

cy·clone

(sī′klōn′)
1. A system of winds that spiral in toward a region of low atmospheric pressure, circling counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. Compare anticyclone.
2. A violent rotating windstorm, such as a hurricane or tornado.
Did You Know? Technically, a cyclone is nothing more than a region of low pressure around which air flows. In the Northern Hemisphere, the air moves counterclockwise around the low-pressure center, while in the Southern Hemisphere, the air travels clockwise. Meteorologists also refer to tropical cyclones, which develop over warm water and can be huge, severe storms. Strong tropical cyclones are better known as hurricanes or typhoons, depending on where in the world they occur. Hurricanes occur in the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, while typhoons occur in the Pacific Ocean. Such storms can be extremely devastating: two cyclones hit a coastal section of India within a few days of each other in 1999, killing an estimated 10,000 people. Because the word cyclone broadly defines a kind of air flow, cyclones are not confined to our planet. In 1999, the Hubble Space Telescope photographed a huge cyclone on Mars.

cyclone

an atmospheric disturbance characterized by powerful winds spinning in the shape of a vertical cylinder or horizontal disk, accompanied by low pressure at the center. — cyclonic, adj.
See also: Wind

cyclone

A low-pressure tropical storm with high speed rotating winds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cyclone - (meteorology) rapid inward circulation of air masses about a low pressure centercyclone - (meteorology) rapid inward circulation of air masses about a low pressure center; circling counterclockwise in the northern hemisphere and clockwise in the southern
meteorology - the earth science dealing with phenomena of the atmosphere (especially weather)
atmospheric state, atmosphere - the weather or climate at some place; "the atmosphere was thick with fog"
low, depression - an air mass of lower pressure; often brings precipitation; "a low moved in over night bringing sleet and snow"
anticyclone - (meteorology) winds spiraling outward from a high pressure center; circling clockwise in the northern hemisphere and counterclockwise in the southern
2.cyclone - a violent rotating windstorm
hurricane - a severe tropical cyclone usually with heavy rains and winds moving a 73-136 knots (12 on the Beaufort scale)
tornado, twister - a localized and violently destructive windstorm occurring over land characterized by a funnel-shaped cloud extending toward the ground
typhoon - a tropical cyclone occurring in the western Pacific or Indian oceans
windstorm - a storm consisting of violent winds

cyclone

noun typhoon, hurricane, tornado, whirlwind, tempest, twister (U.S. informal), storm The death toll from the cyclone has now risen to one-hundred-and-forty.
Translations
إِعْصَارإعصار، عاصِفَه دوّاره
bouřecyklóncyklóna
cyklonhvirvelstormorkan
ZyklonCyclone
pyörremyrskysykloni
ciklona
ciklon
hvirfilbylur, fellibylur
サイクロン
사이클론
ciklonas
ciklons
cyklón
ciklon
cyklon
พายุหมุนไซโคลน
lốc

cyclone

[ˈsaɪkləʊn] Nciclón m

cyclone

[ˈsaɪkləʊn] ncyclone m

cyclone

nZyklon m; cyclone cellar (US) tiefer Keller zum Schutz vor Zyklonen

cyclone

[ˈsaɪkləʊn] nciclone m

cyclone

(ˈsaikləun) noun
a violent wind-storm. The cyclone ripped the roofs off houses and tore up trees.

cyclone

إِعْصَار cyklón cyklon Zyklon κυκλώνας ciclón pyörremyrsky cyclone ciklona ciclone サイクロン 사이클론 cycloon syklon cyklon ciclone циклон cyklon พายุหมุนไซโคลน siklon lốc 旋风
References in classic literature ?
No indeed," returned Polly, with a shudder, "I hate cyclones, anyway.
We were nearing those shores where tempests are so frequent, that country of waterspouts and cyclones actually engendered by the current of the Gulf Stream.
So I took him over home myself; and an amazing kind of a surprise party it was, too -- typhoons and cyclones of frantic joy, and whole Niagaras of happy tears; and by George
There was no garret at all, and no cellar--except a small hole dug in the ground, called a cyclone cellar, where the family could go in case one of those great whirlwinds arose, mighty enough to crush any building in its path.
In the place of their fugitive and warring dreams we have, definitely, Lavalle's Law of the Cyclone which he surprised in darkness and cold at the foot of the overarching throne of the Aurora Borealis.
I never befo' seen such a cyclone as dat," he exclaimed as soon as he had recovered his breath.
Verily, no cyclone or whirlwind is Zarathustra: and if he be a dancer, he is not at all a tarantula-dancer
Here the scenery changed from the strange and unfamiliar to the wreckage of the familiar: patches of ground exhibited the devastation of a cyclone, and in a few score yards I would come upon perfectly undisturbed spaces, houses with their blinds trimly drawn and doors closed, as if they had been left for a day by the owners, or as if their inhabitants slept within.
Once a cyclone had carried away Uncle Henry's house, so that he was obliged to build another; and as he was a poor man he had to mortgage his farm to get the money to pay for the new house.
She got blown to the Land of Oz by a cyclone, and while she was here the Scarecrow and the Tin Woodman accompanied her on her travels.
The little girl was quite an experienced traveller, for she had once been carried by a cyclone as far away from home as the marvelous Land of Oz, and she had met with a good many adventures in that strange country before she managed to get back to Kansas again.
I did not remain long at the Kursaal; the music was good enough, but it seemed rather tame after the cyclone of that Arkansaw expert.