cytogenetics

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cy·to·ge·net·ics

 (sī′tō-jə-nĕt′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of genetics that deals with the cellular components, particularly chromosomes, that are associated with heredity.

cy′to·ge·net′ic, cy′to·ge·net′i·cal adj.
cy′to·ge·net′i·cal·ly adv.
cy′to·ge·net′i·cist (-sĭst) n.

cytogenetics

(ˌsaɪtəʊdʒɪˈnɛtɪks)
n
(Genetics) (functioning as singular) the branch of genetics that correlates the structure, number, and behaviour of chromosomes with heredity and variation
ˌcytogeˈnetic, ˌcytogeˈnetical adj
ˌcytogeˈnetically adv
ˌcytogeˈneticist n

cy•to•ge•net•ics

(ˌsaɪ toʊ dʒəˈnɛt ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the branch of biology linking the study of genetic inheritance with the study of cell structure.
[1930–35]
cy`to•ge•net′ic, adj.
cy`to•ge•net′i•cal•ly, adv.
cy`to•ge•net′i•cist (-ə sɪst) n.

cytogenetics

the branch of biology that studies the structural basis of heredity and variation in living organisms from the points of view of cytology and genetics. — cytogeneticist, n.cytogenetic, cytogenetical, adj.
See also: Biology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cytogenetics - the branch of biology that studies the cellular aspects of heredity (especially the chromosomes)
cytology - the branch of biology that studies the structure and function of cells
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
References in periodicals archive ?
This approach was used to construct the first cytological map of soybean on the basis of chromosome length and euchromatin and heterochromatin distribution.
In soybean, Singh and Hymowitz (1988) identified individual soybean chromosomes by pachytene analysis and constructed the first cytological map based on chromosome length and euchromatin and heterochromatin distribution.
Yet, the development of chromosome mapping, the correspondence between the statistical linkage maps developed by Bridges and Sturtevant from 1912 onward, and the cytological maps established from 1933, were fundamental steps in establishing the physical reality of the gene.