D-day


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Related to D-day: World War 2

D-day

 (dē′dā′)
n.
1. The unnamed day on which an operation or offensive is to be launched.
2. The day on which the Allied forces invaded France during World War II (June 6, 1944).

[D (abbr. of day) + day.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

D-day

n
1. (Historical Terms) the day, June 6, 1944, on which the Allied invasion of Europe began
2. the day on which any large-scale operation is planned to start
[C20: from D(ay)-day; compare H-hour]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

D-day

or D-Day

(ˈdiˌdeɪ)

n.
1. a day set for beginning something.
2. June 6, 1944, the day of the invasion of W Europe by Allied forces in World War II.
[1915–20; Dutch (for day) + day]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

D-day

See: times.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.D-day - date of the Allied landing in France, World War IID-day - date of the Allied landing in France, World War II
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

D-day

[ˈdiːdeɪ] N (Hist) → el día D, el día de la invasión aliada de Normandía (6 junio 1944) (fig) → día m D
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

D-day

n (Hist, fig) → der Tag X
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

D-day

[ˈdiːˌdeɪ] nD-day m giorno dello sbarco alleato in Normandia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The D-Day Juniors say they want to help educate a new generation with the single Pass It On and it has already had the Royal seal of approval.
The free-to-enter exhibition, called SIX.SIX.FORTYFOUR - relating to date of the Normandy landings - has recently been opened at the National Memorial Arboretum, in Staffordshire, and features 29 portraits of D-Day veterans.
Attending the ceremony were nine D-Day veterans, thanks to Honor Flight Chicago.
The strength of Trump's speech here was that, in the style of Ronald Reagan, he evoked the personal lives of the D-Day veterans assembled behind him on the podium.
Scotland's contribution to the D-Day landings was characterised by the courage of soldiers, sailors and those in the air force who took part in the invasion of Normandy, which paved the way to defeating fascism in World War II.
In the UK, the Duke of Cambridge delivered the D-Day address made by his great-grandfather George VI, and met veterans at a ceremony at the National Memorial Arboretum in Alrewas, Staffordshire.
Both were dispatch riders with the Royal Signals on D-Day and the poem, penned by Frank D-Day veteran Denis Wears on his hospital bed after he was injured in the conflict, has been in Donald's family ever since.
Her D-Day bride was displayed at the Knit Hoose on Queen Street this week.
The words "doom", "debarkation" and "deliverance" have all been suggested as meanings for the D in D-Day. But the letter is simply derived from the word "Day" and means the actual day on which a military operation begins.
More than 300 veterans joined leaders representing the Allied nations involved in Operation Overlord at the Portsmouth event marking 75 years since D-Day.