D-notice


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D-notice

n
(Journalism & Publishing) Brit an official notice sent to newspapers, prohibiting the publication of certain security information
[C20: from their administrative classification letter]
References in periodicals archive ?
After the sinking and fearing the effect on morale, Prime Minister Winston Churchill imposed a D-Notice, suppressing publication of documents about the catastrophe, which remains in place to this day.
Because a farm nearby got foot and mouth we were put under a D-Notice, meaning we could not even move our animals around our site," the 48 year-old farmer told the Sunday Mercury.
The British government is so worried that last night it issued a D-Notice,
Shortly after lunchtime, newspapers and broadcasters were contacted by the D-Notice Committee in an attempt to prevent the picture being published, though Mr Quick's actions had caused such alarm the committee was initially able to tell editors only that they "might be in possession" of a photograph that compromised national security, without saying what it was.
While initially splashed all over the papers, the raid was swiftly the subject of a government D-Notice, gagging the press from all further mention.
Churchill placed a D-Notice on the sinking, banning any news of the tragedy, because, Churchill reasoned, it would be bad for morale in a country still coming to terms with the Dunkirk evacuation.
A Government D-notice has been issued, prohibiting the UK media from naming the man.
A is for A-bomb B is for Btech C is for CBBC D is for D-notice E is for email F is for f/stop G is for G-force H is for H-bomb I is for iPod (pictured right) J is for J-Lo K is for K2 mountain L is for (The) L Word TV series M is for M4 motorway N is for nPower O is for (The) O-Zone TV programme P is for P-Diddy Q is for Q-Tips cotton buds R is for R18 movies S is for S Club 7 T is for T-Mobile U is for U-boat V is for V2 rockets W is for 'W' (usually signalled by bored-looking teenagers using both hands to form the letter 'W')
From Admiral David Pulvertaft, chairman of the D-Notice Committee that censors news items impinging on British national security, 13 Jan 1993, to Harold Smith:
AWARE: Sir John and Nuala O'Loan have seen Scap files; SCAP: His face is obscured at the request of the UK's D-Notice Committee which aims to protect 'national security'
The answer to Kate's understandable anger is for the BBC management to get their act together and for the Government to have a clear strategy in handling the media which is not to slap a D-Notice on every bit of information.