D-notice


Also found in: Wikipedia.

D-notice

n
(Journalism & Publishing) Brit an official notice sent to newspapers, prohibiting the publication of certain security information
[C20: from their administrative classification letter]
References in periodicals archive ?
There were no witnesses to the raid, Mr Hale said and he alleged he was served with a "D-Notice" requiring him to hand over the documents in the interests of national security.
After the sinking and fearing the effect on morale, Prime Minister Winston Churchill imposed a D-Notice, suppressing publication of documents about the catastrophe, which remains in place to this day.
"Because a farm nearby got foot and mouth we were put under a D-Notice, meaning we could not even move our animals around our site," the 48 year-old farmer told the Sunday Mercury.
The British government is so worried that last night it issued a D-Notice,
Shortly after lunchtime, newspapers and broadcasters were contacted by the D-Notice Committee in an attempt to prevent the picture being published, though Mr Quick's actions had caused such alarm the committee was initially able to tell editors only that they "might be in possession" of a photograph that compromised national security, without saying what it was.
Reportedly a long time in development, pic went through a couple title changes (including "Baker Street" and "D-Notice").
While initially splashed all over the papers, the raid was swiftly the subject of a government D-Notice, gagging the press from all further mention.
Intriguingly, an official D-notice was quickly slapped on the story, banning all newspaper coverage.
Churchill placed a D-Notice on the sinking, banning any news of the tragedy, because, Churchill reasoned, it would be bad for morale in a country still coming to terms with the Dunkirk evacuation.
A Government D-notice has been issued, prohibiting the UK media from naming the man.
A Government D-notice has been issued, prohibiting UK media from naming the man.