L-plate

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L-plate

n
(Automotive Engineering) Brit a white rectangle with an "L" sign fixed to the back and front of a motor vehicle; a red "L" sign is used to show that a driver using it is a learner who has not passed the driving test; a green "L" sign may be displayed by new drivers for up to a year after passing the driving test
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.L-plate - a square plate bearing the letter L that is attached to both ends of a car to indicate that the driver is a learner
plate - a sheet of metal or wood or glass or plastic
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

L-plate

[ˈelpleɪt] N(placa f de) la L > DRIVING LICENCE/DRIVER'S LICENSE
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

L-plate

(ˈel ˌpleit) noun
a sign with the letter L (short for learner) on it that is attached to a car driven by a learner-driver.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
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References in periodicals archive ?
* Commercial vehicles are defined as those with a D-plate or any vehicle between 8,000 pounds and 12,000 pounds (except personal vehicles with no signage, logos or accessory equipment such as ladder racks), B-plate or those less than 8,000 pounds with signage and accessory equipment, trailers with signage and accessory equipment and box trucks or cube vans.
Again, assuming good condition with a service record, you should pay pounds 1500 for a 1987 D-plate 1.7 litre GLE saloon with 120,000 miles on the clock and pounds 2350 for a 1989 F-reg example on 100,000 miles.