serine

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Related to D-serine: L-serine

ser·ine

 (sĕr′ēn′)
n.
An amino acid, C3H7NO3, that is a common constituent of many proteins.

serine

(ˈsɛriːn; ˈsɪəriːn; -rɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a sweet-tasting amino acid that is synthesized in the body and is involved in the synthesis of cysteine; 2-amino-3-hydroxypropanoic acid. Formula: CH2(OH)CH(NH2)COOH
[C19: from sericin + -ine2]

ser•ine

(ˈsɛr in, -ɪn, ˈsɪər-)

n.
a crystalline amino acid, HOCH2CH(NH2)COOH, found in many proteins and obtained by the hydrolysis of sericin. Abbr.: Ser; Symbol: S
[1875–80; < German Serin (1865); see sericin, -ine2]

ser·ine

(sĕr′ēn′)
A nonessential amino acid. See more at amino acid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.serine - a sweetish crystalline amino acid involved in the synthesis by the body of cysteine
amino acid, aminoalkanoic acid - organic compounds containing an amino group and a carboxylic acid group; "proteins are composed of various proportions of about 20 common amino acids"
Translations
Serin
seryna

serine

n serina
References in periodicals archive ?
(NASDAQ: CNCE) has reported positive results from two studies in its Phase 1 programme evaluating CTP-692, a novel deuterium-modified form of D-serine being developed as an adjunctive treatment for schizophrenia, the company said.
Concert Pharmaceuticals reported results from two studies in its Phase 1 program evaluating CTP-692, a deuterium-modified form of D-serine being developed as an adjunctive treatment for schizophrenia.
Within the central nervous system (CNS), serine has an important role as an excitatory neurotransmitter (as D-serine, and also as a precursor for glycine), as well as a precursor for protein synthesis, folate metabolism, and phospholipid synthesis (3, 4).
Moreover, microglial activation under physiological conditions, in addition to promote the removal of noxious stimuli and the activation of reparative mechanisms, has also the potential of modifying D-serine levels.
Among those were D-serine as an add-on to second-generation antipsychotics; encenicline, an alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist; pomaglumetad methionil, a selective agonist for glutamate receptor subtypes mGluR2 and mGluR3; and bitopertin, a glycine reuptake inhibitor.
NMDARs are regarded as coincidence detectors because of their ligand-gated and voltage-gated properties that its activation requires both binding of glutamate and coagonist (glycine or D-serine) and postsynaptic depolarization.
In a recent large, multicenter study, low dosage D-serine (~30 mg/kg/d) did not separate from placebo, (33) but an open-label study suggests increased efficacy with dosages >30 mg/kg/d.
Led by Jose Feijo, group leader at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC), Portugal, and professor at Lisbon University, this international team has now discovered that the oscillations of calcium ions in the growing pollen tubes of tobacco and the weed Arabidopsis are facilitated by channels called Glutamate receptors-like (GLRs), and that these channels are opened by, amongst other components, a rare aminoacid, D-serine (D-Ser).
Among them are the immuno-histo-chemical study of D-serine, preparing a polyclonal antiserum against D-asparte, inducing muscle contraction in silkworm larva with D-glutamic acid, a primary study of the D-amino acid accumulation system, whether D-amino acids are prevalent among eukaryotes, evaluating their nutrition, and determining D-amino acids in food and beverages using gas chromatography.