serine

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Related to D-serine: L-serine

ser·ine

 (sĕr′ēn′)
n.
An amino acid, C3H7NO3, that is a common constituent of many proteins.

serine

(ˈsɛriːn; ˈsɪəriːn; -rɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a sweet-tasting amino acid that is synthesized in the body and is involved in the synthesis of cysteine; 2-amino-3-hydroxypropanoic acid. Formula: CH2(OH)CH(NH2)COOH
[C19: from sericin + -ine2]

ser•ine

(ˈsɛr in, -ɪn, ˈsɪər-)

n.
a crystalline amino acid, HOCH2CH(NH2)COOH, found in many proteins and obtained by the hydrolysis of sericin. Abbr.: Ser; Symbol: S
[1875–80; < German Serin (1865); see sericin, -ine2]

ser·ine

(sĕr′ēn′)
A nonessential amino acid. See more at amino acid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.serine - a sweetish crystalline amino acid involved in the synthesis by the body of cysteine
amino acid, aminoalkanoic acid - organic compounds containing an amino group and a carboxylic acid group; "proteins are composed of various proportions of about 20 common amino acids"
Translations
Serin
seryna

serine

n serina
References in periodicals archive ?
CTP-692 is a deuterated form of D-serine, an endogenous, required co-agonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NDMA) receptor.
In a recent large, multicenter study, low dosage D-serine (~30 mg/kg/d) did not separate from placebo, (33) but an open-label study suggests increased efficacy with dosages >30 mg/kg/d.
And an analogue of d-serine, d-cycloserine "is also active at the glycine co-agonist site of NMDA receptors.
Led by Jose Feijo, group leader at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC), Portugal, and professor at Lisbon University, this international team has now discovered that the oscillations of calcium ions in the growing pollen tubes of tobacco and the weed Arabidopsis are facilitated by channels called Glutamate receptors-like (GLRs), and that these channels are opened by, amongst other components, a rare aminoacid, D-serine (D-Ser).
D-serine helps promote long-term potentiation (LTP)--the strengthening of synaptic connections associated with learning and memory.
Among them are the immuno-histo-chemical study of D-serine, preparing a polyclonal antiserum against D-asparte, inducing muscle contraction in silkworm larva with D-glutamic acid, a primary study of the D-amino acid accumulation system, whether D-amino acids are prevalent among eukaryotes, evaluating their nutrition, and determining D-amino acids in food and beverages using gas chromatography.
Serine is a required component in the biosynthesis of purines and pyrimidines, as well as an indispensable precursor for the synthesis of the amino acids glycine, cysteine and D-serine.
D-serine antagonized phencyclidine- and MK-801-induced stereotyped behavior and ataxia.
In humans, D-serine is thought to be an endogenous modulator for the NMDA receptor in various neuropsychiatric functions such as learning and nociception and has been implicated in pathological conditions such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease (1, 2, 5, 6).
Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD) has patented high levels of D-serine occur in mammalian brain, where it appears to be an endogenous ligand of the "glycine site" of NMDA receptors.
Further, the use of NMDAR glycine site agonists such as glycine, D-serine, or D-cycloserine in clinical trials has demonstrated some efficacy in ameliorating the negative symptoms and cognitive disabilities in schizophrenics (Coyle and Tsai 2004a, 2004b).
The ability to grow in the presence of glycopeptides results from the change of the C-terminal residue of peptidoglycan precursors (D-Ala) to D-lactate (VanA, VanB, and VanD phenotypes) (6,7) or D-serine (VanC, VanE, and VanG phenotypes) (8-10).