hydrops

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hydrops

(ˈhaɪdrɒps)
n
1. (Medicine) a swelling caused by excessive fluid in cells or tissues
2. (Medicine) a severe swelling of the entire body caused by excess fluid and accompanied by anaemia, occurring in foetuses and newborns affected by haemolytic disease. Also called: fetal hydrops or hydrops fetalis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydrops - swelling from excessive accumulation of watery fluid in cells, tissues, or serous cavitieshydrops - swelling from excessive accumulation of watery fluid in cells, tissues, or serous cavities
angioedema, atrophedema, giant hives, periodic edema, Quincke's edema - recurrent large circumscribed areas of subcutaneous edema; onset is sudden and it disappears within 24 hours; seen mainly in young women, often as an allergic reaction to food or drugs
lymphedema - swelling (usually in the legs) caused by lymph accumulating in the tissues in the affected areas
scleredema - a skin disease marked by hard edema of the tissue usually beginning in the face
cystoid macular edema - a specific pattern of swelling in the central retina
puffiness, swelling, lump - an abnormal protuberance or localized enlargement
anasarca - generalized edema with accumulation of serum in subcutaneous connective tissue
chemosis - edema of the mucous membrane of the eyeball and eyelid lining
papilledema - swelling of the optic disc (where the optic nerve enters the eyeball); usually associated with an increase in intraocular pressure
brain edema, cerebral edema - swelling of the brain due to the uptake of water in the neuropile and white matter
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

hy·drops

n. hidropesía, hidropsia o edema.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the traditional radiological images provide some important information for the diagnosis, the MRI examination is extremely useful for the differential diagnosis, in identifying the extension of the epiphyseal lesion, and in identifying the eventual joint deformity and the soft tissue changes associated with DEH. Also, the role of MRI is important both in the follow-up and in the recurrence [19].
We performed a retrospective review of 160 patients with ipsilateral, contralateral, or bilateral DEH. Eighty-seven patients who did not respond to medical therapy underwent surgical treatment.
Logue has served as principal investigator for DEH. CDC provided a comprehensive review of EPHT in its first phase (McGeehin, Qualters, & Niskar, 2004).