DNA


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
click for a larger image
DNA
A. adenine
T. thymine
C. cytosine
G. guanine

DNA

 (dē′ĕn-ā′)
n.
A nucleic acid that carries the genetic information in cells and some viruses, consisting of two long chains of nucleotides twisted into a double helix and joined by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. DNA sequences are replicated by the cell prior to cell division and may include genes, intergenic spacers, and regions that bind to regulatory proteins.

[d(eoxyribo)n(ucleic) a(cid).]

DNA

n
(Biochemistry) deoxyribonucleic acid; a nucleic acid that is the main constituent of the chromosomes of all organisms (except some viruses). The DNA molecule consists of two polynucleotide chains in the form of a double helix, containing phosphate and the sugar deoxyribose and linked by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. DNA is self-replicating, plays a central role in protein synthesis, and is responsible for the transmission of hereditary characteristics from parents to offspring. See also genetic code
abbreviation for
did not attend

DNA

deoxyribonucleic acid: an extremely long, double-stranded nucleic acid molecule arranged as a double helix that is the main constituent of the chromosome and that carries the genes as segments along its strands: found chiefly in the chromatin of cells and in many viruses.
[1930–35]
click for a larger image

DNA

(dē′ĕn-ā′)
Short for deoxyribonucleic acid. The nucleic acid that is the genetic material determining the makeup of all living cells and many viruses. It consists of two strands of nucleotides linked together in a structure resembling a ladder twisted into a spiral. In eukaryotic cells, the DNA is contained mainly in the nucleus and mitochondria. DNA can replicate itself and synthesize RNA. Compare RNA. See Note at gene.
Did You Know? One of the wonders of nature is that the complexity and diversity of life can be contained in a molecule with a relatively simple structure. Deoxyribonucleic acid, commonly called DNA, exists mainly in the nucleus and mitochondria of each cell in an organism. It consists of two long strands linked together in a structure resembling a ladder twisted into a spiral, called a double helix. Each rung is made up of two chemical bases, called nucleotides, that are joined together by hydrogen bonds. There are four kinds of nucleotides in a DNA molecule: cytosine, guanine, adenine, and thymine—C, G, A, and T, for short. Specific sequences of these bases, known as genes, form codes that contain all of an organism's genetic information. When other components of a cell "read" this code, they produce proteins, the building blocks of life.

DNA

deoxyribonucleic acid.
See also: Heredity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.DNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helixDNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helix; associated with the transmission of genetic information; "DNA is the king of molecules"
cistron, gene, factor - (genetics) a segment of DNA that is involved in producing a polypeptide chain; it can include regions preceding and following the coding DNA as well as introns between the exons; it is considered a unit of heredity; "genes were formerly called factors"
operon - a segment of DNA containing adjacent genes including structural genes and an operator gene and a regulatory gene
biochemistry - the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms; the effort to understand biology within the context of chemistry
base pair - one of the pairs of chemical bases joined by hydrogen bonds that connect the complementary strands of a DNA molecule or of an RNA molecule that has two strands; the base pairs are adenine with thymine and guanine with cytosine in DNA and adenine with uracil and guanine with cytosine in RNA
adenine, A - (biochemistry) purine base found in DNA and RNA; pairs with thymine in DNA and with uracil in RNA
cDNA, complementary DNA - single-stranded DNA that is complementary to messenger RNA or DNA that has been synthesized from messenger RNA by reverse transcriptase
episome - DNA that is not incorporated into the genome but is replicated together with the genome (especially in bacterial cells)
cytosine, C - a base found in DNA and RNA and derived from pyrimidine; pairs with guanine
coding DNA, exon - sequence of a gene's DNA that transcribes into protein structures; "exons are interspersed with introns"
intron, noncoding DNA - sequence of a eukaryotic gene's DNA that is not translated into a protein
junk DNA - stretches of DNA that do not code for genes; "most of the genome consists of junk DNA"
recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid, recombinant DNA - genetically engineered DNA made by recombining fragments of DNA from different organisms
sticky end - an end of DNA in which one strand of the double helix extends a few units beyond the other
jumping gene, transposon - a segment of DNA that can become integrated at many different sites along a chromosome (especially a segment of bacterial DNA that can be translocated as a whole)
guanine, G - a purine base found in DNA and RNA; pairs with cytosine
nucleic acid - (biochemistry) any of various macromolecules composed of nucleotide chains that are vital constituents of all living cells
polymer - a naturally occurring or synthetic compound consisting of large molecules made up of a linked series of repeated simple monomers
T, thymine - a base found in DNA (but not in RNA) and derived from pyrimidine; pairs with adenine
Translations
DNA
DNA
DNA
DNA
DNK
DNA
디옥시리보핵산
DNA
รหัสทางพันธุกรรม
DNA

DNA

A. N ABBR =deoxyribonucleic acidADN m
B. CPD DNA fingerprinting, DNA profiling Nidentificación f mediante el análisis del ADN
DNA testing Npruebas fpl del ADN

DNA

[ˌdiːɛnˈeɪ] (=deoxyribonucleic acid)
nADN m
modif [analysis, database, evidence, profile, sample] → d'ADNDNA fingerprinting nanalyse f de l'empreinte génétiqueDNA sequence nséquence f d'ADNDNA test ntest m ADNDNA testing ntests mpl ADN

DNA

abbr of de(s)oxyribonucleic acidDNS f

DNA

:
DNA fingerprinting, DNA profiling
DNA test
n (Med) → Gentest m
DNA testing
nDNS-Tests pl

DNA

[diːɛnˈeɪ] n abbr =deoxyribonucleic acidDNA m

DNA

الـحِمْضُ النَوَوِيّ DNA DNA DNS DNA ADN DNA ADN DNK DNA DNA 디옥시리보핵산 DNA DNA DNA ADN, DNA ДНК DNA รหัสทางพันธุกรรม DNA DNA 脱氧核糖核酸

DNA

V. deoxyribonucleic acid.
References in classic literature ?
YKCOWREBBAJ sevot yhtils eht dna ,gillirb sawT' ebaw eht ni elbmig dna eryg diD ,sevogorob eht erew ysmim llA .ebargtuo shtar emom eht dnA
How it works is they send out an easy-to-use DNA Collection Kit with simple instructions on how to collect DNA with a buccal swab, this basically collects DNA from the individual's saliva.
DNA 2, Santa Fe--Jenny Landen, 38 Monte Alto Rd, Santa Fe, NM 87508, jenny.
Until now, scientists had extracted small DNA segments from Neandertal bones, mainly from mitochondria outside cell nuclei (SN: 4/1/00, p.
And while scientists are turning ancestry research through DNA into lucrative business opportunities, they are also involved in investigating diseases that plague African Americans at a higher rate and with greater severity such as prostate cancer, breast cancer, Type II diabetes, heart disease, and asthma.
The research will use Orion's proprietary DNA methylation technologies, including MethylScope(r) microarrays and MethylScreen(r) PCR assays.
Biochemical identification and characterization of enzymatic machinery responsible for DNA modification (Bestor et al.
In 1997, Robert Wayne, a geneticist at the University of California at Los Angeles, conducted a DNA study to answer the question.
Because DNA is often the most reliable way to trace evolutionary links, a team led by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, set out to document part of the mammoth genome, which is a map of the creature's DNA.
DNA Chip co-developed that technology with the Research Institute of Genome-Based Biofactory of the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology.
Because conventional microbiologic techniques lack sensitivity, bartonellosis is usually diagnosed by using polymerase chain reaction amplification of organism-specific DNA sequences or serologic testing (1,22-25).
From a single hair follicle, DNA testing provides producers with a "blueprint" of their cattle--including meat yield and tenderness or milk yield and quality--so they can breed, manage and market them accordingly.