DUKW

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DUKW

 (dŭk)
n.
See duck4.

[From a sequence of codes used by General Motors Corporation : D, 1942 (first year of production) + U, utility truck, amphibious + K, front-wheel drive + W, tandem axle.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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"We couldn't get our cargo off because we relied on DUKWs (amphibious vehicles) or barges coming alongside, and we hadn't got what the Army wanted.
DUKWs, nicknamed "ducks", were used on D-Day and played a key role in transporting cargo including weapons from ship to shore.
Originally created by the US Army for use in the Second World War, DUKWs (called "ducks") were amphibious trucks shaped like boats that ferried ammunition, supplies and equipment from offshore ships to troops stationed on beaches.
As the crossing date approached, combat engineers labored to assemble enough DUKWs (amphibious trucks, pronounced "ducks") and gasoline-powered transports (light and fast, 10-foot-long plywood storm boats and larger assault boats capable of carrying 20 men) to make the crossing as quickly and smoothly as possible.
The name Duck Tours is drawn from the vehicles that are an important part of British history as they are the amphibious DUKWs used to take troops ashore for the D-Day landings.
Known by their original military acronym as DUKWs, they were first introduced in the tourism market in 1946 in the Wisconsin Dells, where about 120 of the vessels now operate.
"We got dive bombed by the Germans once, and we lost one of the DUKWs," he said.
Everyone watched the show but to get a better view I climbed up on one of our DUKWs (WWII six-wheeled amphibious trucks, commonly known as "Ducks").
Ducks - which were originally called DUKWs when created in the US to transport men and materials during the Second World War - are no longer in production, and each one still in use is accounted for.
They were in possession of DUKWs, the amphibious military vehicles used to such devastating effect during the D-Day landings.
Much of the artillery loaded on to amphibious DUKWs made them topple over.