Dafydd ap Gwilym


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Dafydd ap Gwilym

(Welsh ˈdævɪθ æp ˈɡwɪlɪm)
n
(Biography) ?1320–?1380, Welsh poet
References in periodicals archive ?
Anghofiwn am gerddi glas Dafydd ap Gwilym am y tro - roedd hynny yn bell yn ol.
Founded in 1164, the abbey is home to the grave of one of Wales's best-known medieval poets - Dafydd ap Gwilym.
Among the topics are sequencing Dafydd ap Gwilym, Suil Ui Dhubhda le Ard na Riogh: oral tradition and history on the Mayo-Sligo border, concentric loyalties: responses to the military in Gaelic women's poetry, Form and function in 19th-century literature: the second reformation movement and the dialogue poems of Daibhi de Barra (1757/8-1851), some remarks on text-internal narrative openers in Early Irish saga texts, and once more the Celtic horse-goddess.
Performed in Welsh and English, Welsh Gold features the work of a number of Wales' most established writers through the years, including Taliesin, Aneirin, Dafydd ap Gwilym, Dannie Abse, Tiffany Atkinson, Gillian Clarke and WH Davies.
Thanks to financial support from the Heritage Lottery Fund, this includes an opportunity to see a new version of the Boston manuscript of Hywel Dda s laws and the Hendregadredd manuscript, which contains Dafydd ap Gwilym s original handwriting.
Y deg a ddewiswyd yw Dewi Sant, Rhodri Mawr, Hywel Dda, Y Dywysoges Nest, Gwenllian, Llywelyn Ein LLyw Olaf, Dafydd ap Gwilym, Owain Glyn Dwer, Twm Sin Cati a Guto Nyth Brn.
"And with regard to the forgeries of poems he claimed were the work of Dafydd ap Gwilym, well again that was part of the age when people were trying to create a way back to their Celtic traditions and it showed a certain brilliance in pulling it off.
Its lessons will benefit not merely Anglicists, but all workers on medieval literature (its comments on narrators, for example, cast light on the Four Branches of the Mabinogi, the poems of Dafydd ap Gwilym, and other texts in the Celtic languages).
Among their topics are heroic dogs and men in the Finn ballads and tales, the death of Dafydd ap Gwilym, Sibyl in Medieval Wales, Elis Gruffydd's meditations of idolatry, medieval heroics without heroes or epics, poetry and pillowtalk, Liadain and Cuirithir and the role of the woman-poet, person-switching in Celtic panegyric, instruction riddles in Welsh law, convergences and tensions among metaphors and metonyms for the heroic society in early Welsh poetry, James Joyce's aural aesthetics, the Old Irish word for fleshfork, and Aogan O Rathaille's shoes and the mock-warrant.
Traditionally the Welsh had no surnames but used the formula 'David the son of William' (in Welsh Dafydd ap Gwilym).
The book is traditionally organized, proceeding chronologically from 'The Earliest Poems' through chapters on the Gogynfeirdd, the prose narratives, history, law, and religious texts, Dafydd ap Gwilym, and concluding with 'The Poets of the Noblemen'.
Developed in the 14th century in South Wales by Dafydd ap Gwilym, the cywydd shows affinities with forms used by the earlier bardd teulu ("bard of the [king's] war band"), the second grade in the Welsh bardic system, and with those of the French trouvere and jongleur.