damnation

(redirected from Damnations)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

dam·na·tion

 (dăm-nā′shən)
n.
1. The act of damning or the condition of being damned.
2.
a. Condemnation to everlasting punishment; doom.
b. Everlasting punishment.
3. Failure or ruination incurred by adverse criticism.
interj.
Used to express anger or annoyance. See Note at tarnation.

damnation

(dæmˈneɪʃən)
n
1. the act of damning or state of being damned
2. a cause or instance of being damned
interj
an exclamation of anger, disappointment, etc

dam•na•tion

(dæmˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of damning or the state of being damned.
[1250–1300]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.damnation - the act of damningdamnation - the act of damning      
denouncement, denunciation - a public act of denouncing
2.damnation - the state of being condemned to eternal punishment in Hell
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
fire and brimstone - (Old Testament) God's means of destroying sinners; "his sermons were full of fire and brimstone"

damnation

noun (Theology) condemnation, damning, sending to hell, consigning to perdition She had a healthy fear of hellfire and eternal damnation.

damnation

noun
A denunciation invoking a wish or threat of evil or injury:
Archaic: malison.
Translations

damnation

[dæmˈneɪʃən]
A. N (Rel) → perdición f
B. EXCL¡maldición!

damnation

[ˌdæmˈneɪʃən]
n (RELIGION)damnation f
exclmerde!

damnation

n (Eccl) (= act)Verdammung f; (= state of damnation)Verdammnis f
interj (inf)verdammt (inf)

damnation

[dæmˈneɪʃn]
1. n (Rel) → dannazione f
2. excl (old) → dannazione!, diavolo!
References in classic literature ?
The colonel, bidden to hear the jarring noises of an engagement in the woods to the left, broke out in vague damnations.
The next thing I saw was that, from outside, he had reached the window, and then I knew that, close to the glass and glaring in through it, he offered once more to the room his white face of damnation. It represents but grossly what took place within me at the sight to say that on the second my decision was made; yet I believe that no woman so overwhelmed ever in so short a time recovered her grasp of the ACT.
Yet when I walk with John Barleycorn I suffer all the damnation of intellectual pessimism.
I can accuse my own conscience of no neglect; though it is at the same time with the utmost concern I see you travelling on to certain misery in this world, and to as certain damnation in the next."