dancehall

(redirected from Dancehall music)

dance·hall

 (dăns′hôl′)
n.
1. or dance hall A building or part of a building with facilities for dancing.
2. A style of reggae music that incorporates hip-hop and rhythm and blues elements. Also called ragga.

dancehall

(ˈdɑːnsˌhɔːl)
n
(Pop Music) a style of dance-oriented reggae, originating in the late 1980s
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References in periodicals archive ?
Raggamuffin music, often abbreviated as ragga, is a subgenre of dancehall music and reggae, in which the instrumentation primarily consists of electronic music.
The Liverpool striker, who is returning from injury, developed his love of Jamaican dancehall music while growing up in the inner-city neighbourhood.
By the early 1990s roots reggae began a tentative revival and by the end of the twentieth century, dancehall music had begun to reflect once again African consciousness through artists like Garnett Silk, Sizzla, Capleton, Morgan Heritage and others.
Today HipHop, coupled with Dancehall music and even what can be described as a Reggaeton style have carried itself across the globe into America and into Jamaica to bring together new fans of both genres.
Key track: Velvette For fans of: Hector Couto, Huxley DAVID RODIGAN MBE Rodigan was given an MBE for his services to broadcasting in 2012, and the British radio DJ is known for his selections of reggae and dancehall music.
12 acts will perform dub, reggae and dancehall music.
Since their 1980s rise to dominance as a popular form of music and culture in Jamaica, dancehall music and culture remain critically under-researched and under-theorized in the academy, even while they continue to generate immense critical debate and social engagement in Jamaica and elsewhere.
A graphic catalog of dastardly deeds and threats delivered in a schizophrenic set of vocal intonations including, but not limited to, a Crypt Keeper cackle and a black metal shriek, Tommy Lee's "Psycho" might just be the grimmest hit in dancehall music history.
1993) This short documentary video by English director Campbell X (aka Blackmail Vision) features female fans of ragga, offering an appraisal of the subculture by its own members--one that talks back to the mainstream, countering conceptions of dancehall music as misogynistic and homophobic.
In Jamaica, homophobic lyrics in dancehall music have been blamed for violent attacks on gay people.