dancehall

(redirected from Dancehall reggae)

dance·hall

 (dăns′hôl′)
n.
1. or dance hall A building or part of a building with facilities for dancing.
2. A style of reggae music that incorporates hip-hop and rhythm and blues elements. Also called ragga.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dancehall

(ˈdɑːnsˌhɔːl)
n
(Pop Music) a style of dance-oriented reggae, originating in the late 1980s
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Peter Mwangi said that he expects more of dancehall reggae and Bob Marley's songs to be played during the show.
I do dancehall reggae music, so I like to spread it across the world.
Damian "Keywee" Morgan is a Dancehall Reggae artist who has been working the music scene in Kingston, Jamaica, for several years now.
Similar to hip hop, sampling often serves a prominent role in raggamuffin music, which is also referred to as dancehall reggae. Apache Indian is popularly known for being "the earliest UK artiste of Asian origin to make an impact on the UK charts with a series of hits during the 90s."
Jamaican Popular Music, from Mento to Dancehall Reggae: A Bibliographic Guide.
was smiles all at the event Jamaican dancehall reggae legend Frankie Paul was the headline act on Sunday, along with music stars from across the UK, Africa and beyond.
Taking to the decks alongside DJ Teddy Jam will be DJ Alex B and DJ 25, who will all be playing the best of urban music, afrobeats, dancehall reggae and old school music.
In a marathon set, the man did ska, northern soul, some classic dancehall reggae, a couple of house anthems and everything between.
Gay activists say that much of the island's homophobia is fuelled by a 150-year-old anti-sodomy law and dancehall reggae performers' anti-gay themes.
Dancehall reggae artist Beenie Man and other recording artists are known for writing songs with lyrics which directly condemn the LGBT community, for example: "Me come to execute all of the gays." In 2012, after he had been banned from performance venues all over the world, Beenie Man offered an apology via YouTube.
The guest talent helps bolster the album's broad stylistic range--from driving electronic dance music ("Looking Hot") and dreamy synth-pop ("One More Summer") to romantically yearning dancehall reggae ("Sparkle") and melancholy dance pop ("Undercover") echoing No Doubt's earliest efforts.
This is the follow-up to his 2006 debut, These Streets, and its a varied affair from fun dancehall reggae through organ-laced soul blues as he runs his Celtic roots head-first into Motown, spiritual soul and heart-warming folk.