Dane


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Related to Dane: Danish

Dane

 (dān)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Denmark.
2. A person of Danish ancestry.

[Middle English Dan, from Old Norse Danr.]

Dane

(deɪn)
n
1. (Peoples) a native, citizen, or inhabitant of Denmark
2. (Peoples) any of the Vikings who invaded England from the late 8th to the 11th century ad

Dane

(deɪn)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Denmark.
[before 950; Middle English Dan, Old English Dene (pl.), influenced by Old Norse Danir (pl.)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dane - a native or inhabitant of Denmark
Danmark, Denmark, Kingdom of Denmark - a constitutional monarchy in northern Europe; consists of the mainland of Jutland and many islands between the North Sea and the Baltic Sea
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Zealander - a native or inhabitant of Zealand
Translations
Dán
dansker
tanskalainen
Danac
Dani
デンマーク人
덴마크 사람
danskdanska
ชาวเดนมาร์ก
người Đan Mạch

Dane

[deɪn] Ndanés/esa m/f

Dane

[ˈdeɪn] nDanois(e) m/f

Dane

nDäne m, → Dänin f

Dane

[deɪn] ndanese m/f

Dane

دَانْـمَرْكِيّ Dán dansker Däne Δανός danés tanskalainen Danois Danac danese デンマーク人 덴마크 사람 Deen danske Duńczyk dinamarquês датчанин dansk ชาวเดนมาร์ก Danimarkalı người Đan Mạch 丹麦人
References in classic literature ?
The real name of the friend was William Dane, and he, too, was regarded as a shining instance of youthful piety, though somewhat given to over-severity towards weaker brethren, and to be so dazzled by his own light as to hold himself wiser than his teachers.
I never saw a finer-looking man, and somehow he reminded me of an ancient Dane. Not that I know much of ancient Danes, though I knew a modern Dane who did me out of ten pounds; but I remember once seeing a picture of some of those gentry, who, I take it, were a kind of white Zulus.
I am a Dane. My father and mother were Danes, and how they ever came to that bleak bight of land on the west coast I do not know.
As they came nearer a dozen dogs ran barking toward them-- gaunt wolf hounds, a huge great Dane, a nimble-footed collie and a number of yapping, quarrelsome fox terriers.
Potter is the great Dane. He is privileged, all over the post, like Shekels, the Seventh Cavalry's dog, and visits everybody's quarters and picks up everything that is going, in the way of news.
The hero was a young Dane, who was going up among the fiords to seek his fortune in the northern fisheries; and by a process inevitable in youth I became identified with him, so that I adventured, and enjoyed, and suffered in his person throughout.
Not long after Mary came back from the asylum, I heard a young Dane, who was helping us to thresh, tell Jake and Otto that Chris Lingard's oldest girl had put Ole Benson out of his head, until he had no more sense than his crazy wife.
"It is Christmas Eve," says he, "I mark the date; here I sit alone on a rude couch of rushes, sheltered by the thatch of a herdsman's hut; I, whose inheritance was a kingdom, owe my night's harbourage to a poor serf; my throne is usurped, my crown presses the brow of an invader; I have no friends; my troops wander broken in the hills of Wales; reckless robbers spoil my country; my subjects lie prostrate, their breasts crushed by the heel of the brutal Dane. Fate!
HROTHGAR, King of the Spear Danes, was a mighty man in war, and when he had fought and conquered much, he bethought him that he would build a great and splendid hall, wherein he might feast and be glad with his people.
The bloody battle alluded to in the text, fought and won by King Harold, over his brother the rebellious Tosti, and an auxiliary force of Danes or Norsemen, was said, in the text, and a corresponding note, to have taken place at Stamford, in Leicestershire, and upon the river Welland.
The horrors which the Anglo-Saxons had inflicted on the Britons they themselves were now to suffer from their still heathen and piratical kinsmen the 'Danes' or Northmen, inhabitants or the Scandinavian peninsula and the neighboring coasts.
The village of Hurley, five minutes' walk from the lock, is as old a little spot as there is on the river, dating, as it does, to quote the quaint phraseology of those dim days, "from the times of King Sebert and King Offa." Just past the weir (going up) is Danes' Field, where the invading Danes once encamped, during their march to Gloucestershire; and a little further still, nestling by a sweet corner of the stream, is what is left of Medmenham Abbey.