Dane


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Related to Dane: Danish

Dane

 (dān)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Denmark.
2. A person of Danish ancestry.

[Middle English Dan, from Old Norse Danr.]

Dane

(deɪn)
n
1. (Peoples) a native, citizen, or inhabitant of Denmark
2. (Peoples) any of the Vikings who invaded England from the late 8th to the 11th century ad

Dane

(deɪn)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Denmark.
[before 950; Middle English Dan, Old English Dene (pl.), influenced by Old Norse Danir (pl.)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dane - a native or inhabitant of Denmark
Danmark, Denmark, Kingdom of Denmark - a constitutional monarchy in northern Europe; consists of the mainland of Jutland and many islands between the North Sea and the Baltic Sea
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Zealander - a native or inhabitant of Zealand
Translations
Dán
dansker
tanskalainen
Danac
Dani
デンマーク人
덴마크 사람
danskdanska
ชาวเดนมาร์ก
người Đan Mạch

Dane

[deɪn] Ndanés/esa m/f

Dane

[ˈdeɪn] nDanois(e) m/f

Dane

nDäne m, → Dänin f

Dane

[deɪn] ndanese m/f

Dane

دَانْـمَرْكِيّ Dán dansker Däne Δανός danés tanskalainen Danois Danac danese デンマーク人 덴마크 사람 Deen danske Duńczyk dinamarquês датчанин dansk ชาวเดนมาร์ก Danimarkalı người Đan Mạch 丹麦人
References in classic literature ?
Not long after Mary came back from the asylum, I heard a young Dane, who was helping us to thresh, tell Jake and Otto that Chris Lingard's oldest girl had put Ole Benson out of his head, until he had no more sense than his crazy wife.
This was bad enough; but, as the philosophic Dane observes, with that universal applicability which distinguishes the illustrious ornament of the Elizabethan Era, worse remains behind
The expression of trusting simplicity in Marner's face, heightened by that absence of special observation, that defenceless, deer-like gaze which belongs to large prominent eyes, was strongly contrasted by the self-complacent suppression of inward triumph that lurked in the narrow slanting eyes and compressed lips of William Dane.
Upon the slightest and most unreasonable pretences, as well as upon accusations the most absurd and groundless, their persons and property were exposed to every turn of popular fury; for Norman, Saxon, Dane, and Briton, however adverse these races were to each other, contended which should look with greatest detestation upon a people, whom it was accounted a point of religion to hate, to revile, to despise, to plunder, and to persecute.
The collie and the fox terriers became frantic with delirious joy, and while the wolf hounds and the great Dane were not a whit less delighted at the return of their master their greetings were of a more dignified nature.
It is Christmas Eve," says he, "I mark the date; here I sit alone on a rude couch of rushes, sheltered by the thatch of a herdsman's hut; I, whose inheritance was a kingdom, owe my night's harbourage to a poor serf; my throne is usurped, my crown presses the brow of an invader; I have no friends; my troops wander broken in the hills of Wales; reckless robbers spoil my country; my subjects lie prostrate, their breasts crushed by the heel of the brutal Dane.
Lower still lies a disabled Dane she is telling the liner all about it in International.
Wid that he begins cursin' ould Dhrumshticks, being so full he dane disrernimbers the Brigade-Major an' the Judge-Advokit- Gen'ral.
At the foot of the stairs, however, she met this Lascar scoundrel of whom I have spoken, who thrust her back and, aided by a Dane, who acts as assistant there, pushed her out into the street.
Not that I know much of ancient Danes, though I knew a modern Dane who did me out of ten pounds; but I remember once seeing a picture of some of those gentry, who, I take it, were a kind of white Zulus.
The hero was a young Dane, who was going up among the fiords to seek his fortune in the northern fisheries; and by a process inevitable in youth I became identified with him, so that I adventured, and enjoyed, and suffered in his person throughout.
Recruited from all ranks of society and from every civilized country of Europe the great horde of Torn numbered in its ten companies serf and noble; Britain, Saxon, Norman, Dane, German, Italian and French, Scot, Pict and Irish.