Danegeld

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Dane·geld

 (dān′gĕld′) also Dane·gelt (-gĕlt′)
n.
A tax levied in England from the 10th to the 12th century to finance protection against Danish invasion.

[Middle English : Dane, genitive pl. of Dan, Dane; see Dane + geld, tribute (from Old English geld, gield, payment).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Danegeld

(ˈdeɪnˌɡɛld) or

Danegelt

n
(Historical Terms) the tax first levied in the late 9th century in Anglo-Saxon England to provide protection money for or to finance forces to oppose Viking invaders
[C11: from Dan Dane + geld tribute; see yield]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Dane•geld

(ˈdeɪnˌgɛld)

also Dane•gelt

(-ˌgɛlt)

n.
(sometimes l.c.) (in medieval England) a land tax believed to have been levied orig. as a tribute to the Danish invaders.
[before 1150; Middle English denegeld, danegeld, Old English (Domesday Book) Danegeld. See Dane, geld2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Danegeld

A tax levied on the Anglo-Saxon population of England to buy off Danish invaders.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
The BHB must realise that, when it comes to low ratings, to paraphrase Kipling, ``As long as they're paying the Dane-Geld, they'll never be rid of the Dane''.
When I first picked up Max Boot's book, however, the first Kipling poem that came to mind, oddly enough, was not "The White Man's Burden," but his lesser known "Danegeld," It is always a temptation for a rich and lazy nation, To puff and look important and to say:-- "Though we know we should defeat you, we have not the time to meet you, We will therefore pay you cash to go away." And that is called paying the Dane-geld; But we've proved it again and again, That if once you have paid him the Dane-geld You never get rid of the Dane.