Danish West Indies


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Danish West Indies

pl n
(Placename) the former possession of Denmark in the W Lesser Antilles, sold to the US in 1917. Name since 1917: Virgin Islands of the United States

Vir′gin Is′lands of the Unit′ed States′


n.pl.
a group of islands in the West Indies, including St. Thomas, St. John, and St. Croix: purchased from Denmark 1917. 110,000; 133 sq. mi. (345 sq. km). Cap.: Charlotte Amalie. Formerly, Danish West Indies.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1917 Denmark sold off the then Danish West Indies islands for $25 million to the United States, which renamed them the United States Virgin Islands.
Hall's Slave Society in the Danish West Indies: St Thomas, St John and St Croix and Pernille Ipsen's Daughters of the Trade: Atlantic Slavers and Interracial Marriage on the Gold Coast (2015).
From the Danish West Indies in the mid-19th century to Biafra in the 1970s, this color-illustrated work profiles 50 former countries that issued their own stamps.
Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack his Jacket.
For the health of the enslaved: Slaves, medicine and power in the Danish West Indies, 1803-1848.
Part 1 is devoted to Alexander Hamilton, who was born in the Danish West Indies, while part 2 profiles Albert Gallatin, a native of Geneva who was secretary of the treasury under presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.
Of the many colonial outposts in the 19th-century Caribbean, the Danish West Indies was perhaps one of the most obscure, occupying as it did only a small handful of islands east of Puerto Rico that were ultimately ceded to American hegemony, becoming the US Virgin Islands.
Gobel, Erik (2002): A Guide to Sources for the History of the Danish West Indies (U.S.
Hugh Thomas's study shows that an estimated 4,000,000 (34.4%) Africans were transported to Brazil; another 2,500,000 (22.1%) to the Spanish Empire; 2,800,000 (17.1%) to the British West Indies; 1,600,000 (14.1%) to the French West Indies; 500,000 (4.4%) to British North America; 500,000 (4.4%) to the Dutch West Indies; 28,000 (0.2%) to the Danish West Indies; 200,000 (1.8%) to Europe and the islands, a total of over 11,328,000.
Croix, he was the mulatto son of one of the leading white families in the Danish West Indies. Beverhout's position among both the whites and people of color in St.
The former Danish West Indies sold to the United States in 1917 has had a fascinating and little known Jewish presence to the point that in the 1830s some visitors coined the expression that the islands should properly be called "The Jewish West Indies."

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