Dantesque

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Related to Dante-esque: Dantesque, Dantean

Dan·te A·li·ghie·ri

 (dän′tā ä′lē-gyĕ′rē) 1265-1321.
Italian poet whose masterpiece, The Divine Comedy (completed 1321), details his visionary progress through Hell and Purgatory, escorted by Virgil, and through Heaven, guided by his lifelong idealized love, Beatrice.

Dan′te·an adj. & n.
Dan·tesque′ (dän-tĕsk′) adj.

Dantesque

from or resembling the characters, scenes, or events in Dante’s works.
See also: Dante
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Dantesque - of or relating to Dante Alighieri or his writings
Translations
dantei

Dantesque

adjdantesk
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References in periodicals archive ?
building tense mystery through a sustained crescendo to a Dante-esque onslaught.
EVOKING numerous religious connotations, the prehistoric Caves of Arta have been attracting curious 'worshippers' for years, and the various atmospheric chambers given Dante-esque names like Hell, Paradise and Purgatory.
The "six-pack" sleeping arrangements for the crew seem Dante-esque to him.
Castro said Saturday night that "Valparaiso is without electricity at the moment and this means the flame column is creating a Dante-esque panorama and is advancing in an apparently uncontrollable manner.
We'll go from a Dante-esque world of wonders and horrors to the usual world in which plenty goes wrong, some things go right, most people muddle through, and insurance professionals try to figure out how to cut through all of the institutional nonsense and solve problems.
This is not surprising since efforts to contain this Dante-esque scene are going to take 40 years or more, with endless costs to be paid for by the taxpayer.
It's a Dante-esque scene," Alberto Nunez Feijoo, president of the regional government, told news radio Cadena Ser.
The scene is shocking, it's Dante-esque," said the head of the surrounding Galicia region, Alberto Nunez Feijoo, in a radio interview.
It manifests first as a fever, quickly reaching the scale of clashing passions; then goes from begging to threatening, from prayer to blasphemy, from anger to sheer numbness, until the intensity of this Dante-esque struggle devolves into agony and submerges into the ice of a slow and convulsive death.
Now his name and that of his novel Les Bienveillantes (The Kindly Ones)--a Dante-esque plunge into the daily toil of an ideologically confused SS officer--is on everyone's lips.
As a consequence, my reaction to the Iraqi tragedy--a tragedy occurring at a Dante-esque scale--is three-dimensional.