Dantesque


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Related to Dantesque: Dantean

Dan·te A·li·ghie·ri

 (dän′tā ä′lē-gyĕ′rē) 1265-1321.
Italian poet whose masterpiece, The Divine Comedy (completed 1321), details his visionary progress through Hell and Purgatory, escorted by Virgil, and through Heaven, guided by his lifelong idealized love, Beatrice.

Dan′te·an adj. & n.
Dan·tesque′ (dän-tĕsk′) adj.

Dantesque

from or resembling the characters, scenes, or events in Dante’s works.
See also: Dante
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Dantesque - of or relating to Dante Alighieri or his writings
Translations
dantei

Dantesque

adjdantesk
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References in periodicals archive ?
This Dantesque quality is leavened with considerable irony.
This is also connected with another Dantesque reference as is shown in H.
In this hell on earth, Ortese's conversations take on an explicitly Dantesque tone.
Mais elle doit son grand succes a sa ligne seduisante, sa polyvalence bitume/chemin epatante et un fantastique gromono offrant un couple dantesque rarement egale depuis.
to travel alive among the dead." Dante is thus figured as the ultimate poet of the Albanian experience; "Dantesque" describes nothing if not the spiraling centuries of Albanian life under multiple empires and then Hoxha.
Sanity demands that the world awakens to the plight of thousands of homeless Kashmiris experiencing the transmutation of their homeland from the heaven it once was to the Dantesque' hell it presents in contemporary times, after all the exigent demand for freedom and peace does not and should not mandate the perpetual condemnation of individuals or nations.
between good and evil, and a Dantesque descent and Pilgrim's
Despite the setbacks, victory is achieved and "Dantesque retaliation" is visited on Fascists by their anti-Fascist opponents.
Those twenty years help to explain the rage, the hatred and brutality, the Dantesque retaliation visited on so many Fascists by their anti-Fascist opponents.
That fascination granted, I also maintain that I did not approach the reading of my father's baseball memoir with an expectation or even a hope of Dantesque echoes.
But this Dantesque passage from Heart of Darkness suggests that Marlow is neither coward nor spectator because he so fully perceives and sympathizes with the suffering of these natives.