Taoism

(redirected from Daoists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Daoists: Taoism

Tao·ism

 (dou′ĭz′əm, tou′-) also Dao·ism (dou′-)
n.
A principal philosophy and system of religion of China that is based on writings attributed to Lao Tzu, Chuang Tzu, and others, and advocates conforming one's behavior and thought to the Tao.

Tao′ist n.
Tao·is′tic adj.

Taoism

(ˈtaʊɪzəm)
n
1. (Other Non-Christian Religions) the philosophy of Lao Zi that advocates a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events
2. (Other Non-Christian Religions) a popular Chinese system of religion and philosophy claiming to be teachings of Lao Zi but also incorporating pantheism and sorcery
ˈTaoist n, adj
Taoˈistic adj

Tao•ism

(ˈdaʊ ɪz əm, ˈtaʊ-)

n.
1. a Chinese philosophic tradition founded by Lao-tzu, advocating a life of simplicity and naturalness and of noninterference with the course of natural events, in order to attain a happy existence in harmony with the Tao.
2. a pantheistic religion based on this tradition, whose practitioners seek longevity and immortality.
[1830–40]
Tao′ist, n., adj.
Tao•is′tic, adj.

Taoism

1. a philosophical system evolved by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu, especially its advocacy of a simple and natural life and of noninterference with the course of natural events in order to have a happy existence in harmony with the Tao.
2. a popular Chinese religion, purporting to be based on the principles of Lao-tzu, but actually an eclectic polytheism characterized by superstition, alchemy, divination, and magic. Also called Hsüan Chiao.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Taoism - a Chinese sect claiming to follow the teaching of Lao-tzu but incorporating pantheism and sorcery in addition to TaoismTaoism - a Chinese sect claiming to follow the teaching of Lao-tzu but incorporating pantheism and sorcery in addition to Taoism
religious order, religious sect, sect - a subdivision of a larger religious group
Tao, Taoist - an adherent of any branch of Taoism
2.Taoism - religion adhering to the teaching of Lao-tzu
Daoism, Taoism - philosophical system developed by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu advocating a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events
organized religion, religion, faith - an institution to express belief in a divine power; "he was raised in the Baptist religion"; "a member of his own faith contradicted him"
Tao, Taoist - an adherent of any branch of Taoism
3.Taoism - popular Chinese philosophical system based in teachings of Lao-tzu but characterized by a pantheism of many gods and the practices of alchemy and divination and magic
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
4.Taoism - philosophical system developed by Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu advocating a simple honest life and noninterference with the course of natural events
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Tao - the ultimate principle of the universe
Taoism - religion adhering to the teaching of Lao-tzu
Translations
DaoismusTaoismus
daoizamtaoizam
taoizmus
taoizm

Taoism

[ˈtaʊɪzəm] Ntaoísmo m

Taoism

nTaoismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
Many Daoists, as well as some disillusioned Confucians, were attracted to the apparent similarity of Buddhist teachings with those familiar to them from texts such as the Laozi (Daodejing) and the Zhuangzi and movements such as the "Dark Learning" (xuanxue) school.
Harnessing the power of water allows each of us to slowly change the hardest obstacles in our lives with the consistent pressure of what the Daoists refer to as the softest element.
3) This formation of mountains, either distant or looming near the picture plane "forms the pivot connecting human and scared realms" and was seen by Daoists as the place where the primordial energy, Qi, was strong and refined, alive and breathing.
Daoists are fond of using paradox as a motif for analysis, and Zhuangzi specifically considers useful/ useless in his writings.
While I appreciate the point about the gap between what modern Western scholars (2) stipulate as Confucian, I think, for instance, that scholars such as Mengzi, Xunzi, Zhu Xi (1130-1200), and his student Chen Chun (1159-1223) had an excellent idea about who they were as Confucians or Ru as they would have defined themselves over against other Chinese thinkers such as Yang Zhu, Mozi, and, later, Buddhists or Daoists.
Daoists and Buddhists alike talk of a gate between Earth and Heaven, and use smoke and fire to open the gate and reach the other side.
He seeks to articulate how Daoist ethics in general and ZhuangziAEs ethics in particular depart from accepted understanding of morality and ways that early Daoists like Zhuangzi imagine the moral life, as well as to examine how histories of interpretation, particularly in comparative contexts, can influence and bias not only understanding of specific texts and figures, but also entire categories of investigation.
The Daoists have always favored what is known as wabi-sabi in Japan, the idiosyncratic or unique; the Confucians favor order, forms, and norms.
Written for scholars of literature, this volume also explores religious, environmental and philosophical concerns in traditional and modern Chinese culture and how these values still affect Daoists on the other side of the Pacific Ocean.
Regarding Jeffrey Dippmann's (Central Washington University) essay on "Daoist civility" and "polite Daoists," Rosemont wonders, "what could Lao Tan, Zhuangzi, Liu An or Liezi have to do with these?
These techniques helped people behave like better Confucians in their personal relations and better Daoists in relation to the natural world.
In contrast to western preoccupation with the necessary or eternal principles and the transcendent patterns (logical order), the Daoists stressed spontaneity and rejected any preassigned pattern.