darbuka

(redirected from Darabuka)

dar·bu·ka

 (där-bo͞o′kə)
n.
A goblet- or hourglass-shaped hand drum having a single drumhead, typically held in the lap or under the arm and widely used in Middle Eastern, Balkan, and North African music. Also called dumbek.

[Ultimately (partly via Turkish darbuka) from Arabic darabukka, dirbakka, perhaps from Syriac 'ardbakkā.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
It's hard to put a label on their music as it brings together rootsy Scottish folk and tango stylings, classical virtuosity and power, flavours of Latin jazz and a rich percussion sound that includes Indian tabla and Middle Eastern darabuka.
The musical evening contained an interactive narration through innovative rhythmic dialogue on the tabla, violin, flute and followed by an ensemble between the tabla, dholak, kadtaal, pakhawaj, udu djembe and darabuka, the ICC said in a statement.
The musical evening will include interactive narrations through innovative rhythmic dialogue on the tabla, violin and flute followed by an ensemble between tabla, dholak, kadtaal, pakhawaj, udu, djembe and darabuka. The concert will also give an insight into folklores of the Indian state of Rajasthan.
In an episode titled "I'lam Aldarabuka" (Media of darabuka: colloquial term for belly-dancing rhythms indicative of wavering), he noted how state-loyal media returned to grooming the interim military council leader as it used to do with Mubarak.
Percussive movements, which usually include lifts and drops of the ribs, shoulders and hips, necessitate the presence of 'rhythm instruments': doumbek or darabuka drums, riks (a type of tambourine) and Western-style drums with sticks belong to rhythm instrument family.
From Europe to Asia and North America, each day lovers of Oriental dance watch el-Farah (Arabic for Joy), el-Teet and Darabuka (the drum) channels on NileSat 1 to enjoy this ancient Egyptian art.
In fact, they utilize viola da gamba, guitars, bajon, tambor, cittern, pandero, panderetilla, darabuka, castanets, psaltery, organ, and, yes, the harp.
The musical evening will contain interactive narrations through innovative rhythmic dialogue on the tabla, violin and flute, followed by an ensemble between the tabla, dholak, kadtaal, pakhawaj, udu, djembe and darabuka. The concert will also give an insight into folklores of Rajasthan.
The concert opened with Marcel Khalife's lively composition called Salute for Darabuka and orchestra.