Darapti

Darapti

a mnemonic word to represent a syllogistic argument in the third figure, in which there are two universal affirmative premises and a particular affirmative conclusion.
See also: Logic
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These deductions are all particular, whether affirmative (see Darapti, Disamis, and Datisi) or privative (see Felapton, Ferison, and Bocardo).
Thus, Aristotle converts the minor premise "every S is R" into "some R is S," allowing him to reduce Darapti (3.1) to the complete deduction Darii (1.3) of the first figure:
The minor extreme R in the incomplete Darapti (3.1) is both a predicate in the minor premise and a subject in the conclusion, and is then reduced to the minor extreme R in the complete Darii (1.3), namely a subject in both the premise and the conclusion.
(2) Darapti, Disamis, and Datisi (in the third figure) have a potential inferential necessity, reduced to the inferential necessity of the complete Darii (in the first figure).
(33) A universal deduction requires that all its premises be universal, but this does not mean that all deductions with universal premises are universal, as we shall see with Darapti and Felapton in the third figure.
(24) We recall that the following syllogisms, tagged Darapti and Camestros by the Medievals respectively, are valid for Aristotelian syllogistic: