Darius III


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Darius III

Died 330 bc.
King of Persia (336-330) who was defeated in several battles by Alexander the Great. His murder by a Bactrian satrap effectively ended the Persian Empire.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Darius III

n
(Biography) died 330 bc, last Achaemenid king of Persia (336–330), who was defeated by Alexander the Great
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Darius III


n.
(Codomannus), died 330 B.C., king of Persia 336–330.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.Darius III - king of Persia who was defeated by Alexander the GreatDarius III - king of Persia who was defeated by Alexander the Great; his murder effectively ended the Persian Empire (died in 330 BC)
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References in periodicals archive ?
GOOGLING A RUNNER Battle Of Issus 8.50 Nottingham This took place in 333 BC in southern Anatolia, Turkey between the Hellenic league led by Alexander the Great and the Achaemenid empire led by Darius III. It resulted in a sound victory for Alexander's troops and was the second great battle in his conquest of Asia.
The name "Beth Garmai" or "Beth Garme" may be of Syriac origin meaning "the house of bones", thought to refer to bones of slaughtered Achaemenids after a decisive battle between Alexander the Great and Darius III on the plains between the Upper Zab and Diyala river.
Alexander of Macedonia after defeating Darius III in 330 B.C.
Looting has been a part of war at least since 333BC when Alexander the Great strolled into the tent of King Darius III and helped himself to the vanquished Persian's best tapestries.
331BC: Alexander the Great's Macedonians won a decisive victory over the Persians led by Darius III at the battle of Gaugamela, leading to the downfall of the Persian Empire: Darius was murdered by one of his own aristocrats after the defeat.
Pierre Briant exposes the prevailing Eurocentric view of the Persian Empire and of its rulers, which perpetuated the image of Darius III as a coward, or, at best, a conscientious king disadvantaged by his antagonist's military genius, and the notion that Alexander conquered an empire on the brink of collapse (42-55).
the GreatAAEs triumph over Persian king Darius III at the Battle of Gaugamela, which ultimately led to the demise of the Achaemenid Empire.
At Issus, he faced 100,000 men commanded by Persia's King Darius III. Alexander's tactical genius won the day.
Then we turn to Persia with two papers from Pierre Briant: "The Empire of Darius III in Perspective" and "Alexander and the Persian Empire, between 'Decline' and 'Renovation': History and Historiography." The first of these puts Persia in the foreground, arguing for a continuity in ruling patterns between the Achaemenids and Alexander, and the second shows the evolution of popular trends in studies of Alexander--how these sometimes say more about the current politics and conceptualizations of history in the writer's time rather than in Alexander's.