dark tourism


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dark tourism

n
tourism to sites associated with tragedies, disasters, and death
References in periodicals archive ?
Se puede decir que este tipo de turismo forma parte del fenomeno del dark tourism, que es la oferta y el consumo, por parte de los visitantes, de la muerte real y mercantilizada, de lugares donde ocurrieron desastres y atrocidades y de cementerios (Lennon & Foley, 2000).
A lifelong Halloween, horror, and dark tourism enthusiast, Kullstroem holds seminars on how scare venues blend history, theater, and social interaction, and she enjoys exploring what these shows can teach us about our society and the people around us.
Virtual Traumascapes and Exploring the Roots of Dark Tourism
Some definitions of dark tourism can be quite broad, as say the one offered by Richard Sharpley: " [Dark] tourism may be defined simply and more generally as the act of travel to sites associated with death, suffering and the seemingly macabre.
As clues to our possible future behaviour, Dr Wright cites our past fascination for public executions and current interest in violent films and video games, plus the popularity of Dark Tourism to places associated with death, disaster or the macabre.
Here's how Professor Duncan Light from Liverpool Hope University, specialized in Dark Tourism describes them: I agree with those people who say that Dracula is a way to get foreign tourists into Romania creating an opportunity to show them all the other things the country can offer.
uk/) the Institute for Dark Tourism Research , or iDTR, which opened its doors at the UK's University of Central Lancashire on April 24.
For instance, none of the chapters adequately address issues pertaining to dark tourism and its significance in tourism studies (Yiakoumaki mentions dark tourism in a footnote).
Here are four perspectives: (1) being at a location where you relive in memory a major human tragedy you witnessed or experienced; (2) viewing a contextualized landscape which informs you of a major human tragedy that occurred; (3) entering a foreboding dark tourism site and experiencing thanatourism (tourism related to sites associated with death or suffering) in a location of mass murder; and (4) the liquid hush of the reflective pools that moves you to contemplate an absence, a sense of loss, and emptiness in the tradition of the Ryoanji Zen Buddhist rock garden in Kyoto, Japan (http://www.
Dark tourism certainly has its adherents, and they certainly do it well in this dark and forbidding Victorian citadel of punishment.
As Lennon and Foley point out, dark tourism is all the more potent when people still living can validate dark events.
A NEW kind of macabre dark tourism could start in Birmingham, with the city's coffin factory at its black heart.