darknet

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Related to Darknets: tor

darknet

(ˈdɑːkˌnɛt)
n
a covert communication network on the internet

darknet

A network or internet service that allows users to transfer data anonymously.
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Mostly in Asia, a vivid market for Bitcoin remittance has emerged, and the Bitcoin using darknets of cybercrime are flourishing.
Many variants of Ransomware have started using Darknets (networks often used by cyber criminals for anonymity as these can only be accessed with specific software using non-standard communications protocols) for either command or control or to receive payments.
Darknets, on the other hand, are specific private niches in the Deep Web that are intended to for access by trusted users.
Number two, we are going to see more and more darknets coming up.
Glasgow Girls, Keys to the Castle, Holiday of My Lifetime with Len Goodman, It Was Alright In The 70s, Cybercrimes with Ben Hammersley: Darknets, Scotland in a Day, Scotland Decides: The Big, Big Debate, and Bob Servant all walked off with awards.
The highest-access tiers are usually hidden in darknets, with anonymization and cryptographic features.
While the CryptoNet might have been fiction when May wrote his manifesto, darknets informed his vision of the future of computer networks.
The RAND study says there will be more activity in 'darknets', more checking and vetting of participants, more use of crypto-currencies such as Bitcoin, greater anonymity capabilities in malware, and more attention to encrypting and protecting communications and transactions.
This is tiny when compared to the volume of Bitcoin transactions in the Darknets. With Bitcoins in hand, a criminal can buy their way into being an incredibly effective cybercriminal, so we can expect to see cybercrime exponentially expand as both the supply and demand side of the markets are booming.
The RAND study says there will be more activity in "darknets," more checking and vetting of participants, more use of crypto-currencies such as Bitcoin, greater anonymity capabilities in malware, and more attention to encrypting and protecting communications and transactions.
National CERT bodies, meanwhile, go out of their way to support ISPs with up-to-date threat lists drawn from honeynets, darknets and automated malware analysis tools, distributing this data as a matter of course.
Usually darknets are confined to small groups such as hackers, who use the secure connections to share tips and tools.