Darwin's finches

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Darwin's finches

pl n
(Animals) the finches of the subfamily Geospizinae of the Galapagos Islands, showing great variation in bill structure and feeding habits: provided Darwin with evidence to support his theory of evolution

Dar′win's finch′es


n. pl.
a group of Galapagos Island finches, esp. of the genus Geospiza, that were observed by Charles Darwin and provide a striking example of speciation.
[1945–50]
References in periodicals archive ?
Genomic sequencing and the analysis of physical characteristics have confirmed the new species of Darwin's finch, which its discoverers - Peter and B.
O blith yr adar, mi oedd o'n bleser gweld y bwbi a'i draed mawr, y ffrigad a'i dagell goch ac wrth gwrs - llinos Darwin neu'r Darwin's finch - a oedd mor allweddol yn natblygiad theori esblygiad wrth iddo sylweddol bod yr aderyn wedi esblygu mewn ffyrdd mor wahanol ar amrywiol ynysoedd y Galapagos.
The woodpecker finch also belongs to the Darwin's finch group, but it is an insect eater whose specialty is to find termites and grubs hidden in dead wood.
For over two decades Peter and Rosemary Grant have examined the ecology and evolution of Darwin's finch species inhabiting the Galapagos islands (Grant et al.
It is therefore not surprising that Darwin's finch species, although differing from each other in body mass, bill size and shape, and song, show no indication of genetic incompatibility after a period of less than 3 million yr since divergence from a common ancestor (P.
To place the colonization in perspective, we briefly summarize pertinent knowledge of Darwin's finch species elsewhere in the Galapagos archipelago.
(1984a) had employed the methods of this paper, explicitly dealing with character correlations, to estimate the minimal selective forces involved in transitions from one Darwin's finch species to another.
We present the results of a 17-yr study of hybridizing Darwin's finch species on one of the Galapagos islands.
They will be exploring aspects of evolution, from the peppered moth to Darwin's finches and how soil pollution can rapidly alter plants.
Much of their original work identified differences in the hardness of the seeds they eat, a story quite similar to that of Darwin's finches. Smith, who is a professor at UCLA as well as the founding director of the Center for Tropical Research, established a breeding colony of these finches to understand the inheritance of beak size.
According to artist Eloisa Guanlao, "Darwin's Finches are at once fossilized records and a critical examination of the myopia of nineteenth century positivist science that endures today." The wet collodion glass ambrotypes depict images of "stuffed" birds endemic to the southeast region of the United States.
Which islands are home to giant tortoises and Darwin's finches? 10.