Darwin's finches


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Darwin's finches

pl n
(Animals) the finches of the subfamily Geospizinae of the Galapagos Islands, showing great variation in bill structure and feeding habits: provided Darwin with evidence to support his theory of evolution

Dar′win's finch′es


n. pl.
a group of Galapagos Island finches, esp. of the genus Geospiza, that were observed by Charles Darwin and provide a striking example of speciation.
[1945–50]
References in periodicals archive ?
Also notable in this issue are reports on slipperiness in plate tectonics (Page 6), a gene that largely controls beak shape in Darwin's finches (Page 7) and a forecast of megadroughts in the U.
Birds that are related, such as Darwin's finches, but that vary in beak size and behavior specially evolved to their habitat are examples of a process called speciation.
You're likely to see flamingos and green sea turtles, flightless cormorants, bright marine iguanas, Espanola lava lizards, hood mockingbirds, swallow-tailed gulls, blue-footed boobies, Nazca boobies, redbilled tropicbirds, Galapagos hawks, Darwin's finches, waved albatross and even penguins, dolphins, shark and whales.
Another example are Darwin's finches, whose beaks evolved over millions of years with changes in birdsong, an important mating signal, and thus contributed to the rise of new and distinct finch species.
Plant-animal interactions: consumption of seeds by Darwin's finches.
The life cycle of Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae) parasitizing Darwin's finches and its impacts on nestling survival.
Darwin's finches, of course, provide a classic example, modestly based on foraging, not fighting.
Over more than 35 years of field study on the Galapagos Islands, the Grants have demonstrated that natural selection allows the morphology and behavior of Darwin's finches to change rapidly in response to environmental fluctuations.
Peter and Rosemary Grant, evolutionary biologists whose field research on Darwin's finches in the Galapagos Islands over three decades has demonstrated rapid evolution caused by natural selection in response to environmental change; and
Over nearly 40 years of field research on the Galapagos Islands, the Grants have demonstrated that natural selection allows the morphology and behavior of Darwin's finches to change rapidly in response to environmental fluctuations.
Guerrero and Tye (2009, 2011), report Darwin's finches and other Galapagos birds demonstrate three main types of fruit-seed handling techniques: (1) swallow the entire fruit or pieces of it, (2) discard the seeds, eating only the pulp, and (3) crushing the fruit and seed.