dataveillance


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dataveillance

(ˈdeɪtəˌveɪləns)
n
(Law) the surveillance of a person's activities by studying the data trail created by actions such as credit card purchases, mobile phone calls, and internet use
[from data + surveillance]
Translations

dataveillance

nDatenüberwachung f, → Überwachung fvon Kunden- und Personendaten
References in periodicals archive ?
Datafication, dataism and dataveillance: Big data between scientific paradigm and ideology.
The last aspect is of particular relevance in today's "era of ubiquitous dataveillance".
Though the Supreme Court ruling did not directly refer to the UID programme, it did refer to the risks of "dataveillance" and the "permanency" of data sets.
Marketing Dataveillance and Digital Privacy: Using Theories of Justice to Understand Consumers' Online Privacy Concerns.
Kevin Lapp laments the "pathology of 'dataveillance' [which] nearly always sees the solution as more data collection and greater dissemination." (293) Others worry that to the extent that data anonymizes decisions, there is a risk that there is less room for empathy.
In directing attention to issues of dataveillance and privacy, questions of ownership and the exploitation of immaterial labour, the growing ecological footprints of digital technologies, as well as questions of information and attention management, I hope to productively inform on-going debates about digital competencies and literacies.
1393, 1417 (2001) ("Dataveillance is thus a new form of surveillance, a method of watching not through the eye or the camera, but by collecting facts and data.").
More tellingly, in the wake of Edward Snowden's revelations about massive American 'dataveillance' operations in the service of uncontained political initiatives nominally tied to an anti-terrorism agenda, which have exploited contemporary communication platforms in a more direct and disturbing fashion, Leistner's perspective appears unwittingly naive and incomplete.
(34.) On the practices and rhetorics of counterveillance, see Rita Raley, "Dataveillance and Counterveillance," in "Raw Data" Is an Oxymoron, ed.
Kate Crawford has recently suggested that the everyday lived experience of big data is one of "surveillant anxiety": the fear that the personal information that individuals disclose about themselves and that others generate about them is intercepted and analyzed by the intelligence services within emergent praxes of pervasive dataveillance. I empirically assess this notion of "surveillant anxiety" in the context of spatial big data.
Benjamin Zhu, A Traditional Tort for a Modern Threat: Applying Intrusion upon Seclusion to Dataveillance Observations, 89 N.Y.U.