cell division

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cell division

n.
The process by which a cell divides into two or more cells. Fission, mitosis, and meiosis are forms of cell division.

cell division

n
(Biology) cytology the division of a cell into two new cells during growth or reproduction. See amitosis, meiosis, mitosis

cell′ divi`sion


n.
the division of a cell or cells in reproduction or growth.
[1880–85]

cell division

The process by which a cell divides into two or more cells. Cell division is the means of reproduction in organisms that reproduce asexually, as by fission or spore formation. In organisms that reproduce sexually, cell division is the source of all tissue growth and repair. The two main types of cell division are mitosis and meiosis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cell division - the process in reproduction and growth by which a cell divides to form daughter cellscell division - the process in reproduction and growth by which a cell divides to form daughter cells
amitosis - the direct method of cell division characterized by simple division of the nucleus without formation of chromosomes
segmentation, cleavage - (embryology) the repeated division of a fertilised ovum
meiosis, miosis, reduction division - (genetics) cell division that produces reproductive cells in sexually reproducing organisms; the nucleus divides into four nuclei each containing half the chromosome number (leading to gametes in animals and spores in plants)
mitosis - cell division in which the nucleus divides into nuclei containing the same number of chromosomes
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
Translations

cell division

n (Bio) → divisione f cellulare
References in periodicals archive ?
most eukaryotic cells), segregation of individual chromosomes is accomplished by first attaching mitotic spindle fibers to a centromeric region on each daughter chromosome, and then pulling apart of the paired daughter chromosomes toward opposite cell poles.
The two chromatids of each chromosome are now called daughter chromosomes as they move apart through the cytoplasm to the opposite poles of the cell.
Duplication of the whole complement of the chromosomes in the same cell (polyploidy, a consequence of lack of disjunction between the daughter chromosomes following replication) is also seen in nature.