Venus

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Venus
false-color image produced from radar images taken by the Magellan probe

Ve·nus

 (vē′nəs)
n.
1. Roman Mythology The goddess of love and beauty.
2. The second planet from the sun, having an average radius of 6,052 kilometers (3,761 miles), a mass 0.82 times that of Earth, and a sidereal period of revolution about the sun of 224.7 days at a mean distance of approximately 108.2 million kilometers (67.2 million miles).

[Middle English, from Old English, from Latin, love, Venus; see wen- in Indo-European roots.]

Venus

(ˈviːnəs)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) the Roman goddess of love. Greek counterpart: Aphrodite
2. (Anatomy) mount of Venus See mons veneris

Venus

(ˈviːnəs)
n
1. (Celestial Objects) one of the inferior planets and the second nearest to the sun, visible as a bright morning or evening star. Its surface is extremely hot (over 400°C) and is completely shrouded by dense cloud. The atmosphere is principally carbon dioxide. Mean distance from sun: 108 million km; period of revolution around sun: 225 days; period of axial rotation: 244.3 days (retrograde motion); diameter and mass: 96.5 and 81.5 per cent that of earth respectively
2. (Alchemy) the alchemical name for copper1

Ve•nus

(ˈvi nəs)

n., pl. -us•es.
1. an ancient Italian goddess, identified by the Romans with Aphrodite as the goddess of love and beauty.
2. an exceptionally beautiful woman.
3. the most brilliant planet, second in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of 7521 miles (12,104 km), a mean distance from the sun of 67.2 million miles (108.2 million km), a period of revolution of 224.68 days, and no moons.
4. Also called Ve′nus fig`ure. (sometimes l.c.) a statuette of a female figure, usu. carved of ivory and typically having exaggerated breasts, belly, or buttocks, often found in Upper Paleolithic cultures from Siberia to France.
[< Latin Venus, s. Vener- orig. a neuter common n. meaning “physical desire,” hence “qualities exciting desire, charm,” “a goddess personifying sexual attractiveness”; c. Skt vanaḥ desire, akin to wish; compare venerate, venom]

Ve·nus

(vē′nəs)
The second planet from the sun and the fourth smallest, with a diameter about 400 miles less than that of Earth. Venus comes nearer to Earth than any other planet and is the brightest object in the night sky aside from Earth's moon. It is the hottest planet in the solar system, with an average surface temperature of 867°F (464°C). See Table at solar system. See Note at planet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Venus - the second nearest planet to the sunVenus - the second nearest planet to the sun; it is peculiar in that its rotation is slow and retrograde (in the opposite sense of the Earth and all other planets except Uranus); it is visible from Earth as an early `morning star' or an `evening star'; "before it was known that they were the same object the evening star was called Venus and the morning star was called Lucifer"
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
2.Venus - goddess of loveVenus - goddess of love; counterpart of Greek Aphrodite
3.Venus - type genus of the family Veneridae: genus of edible clams with thick oval shells
mollusk genus - a genus of mollusks
family Veneridae, Veneridae - hard-shell clams
Mercenaria mercenaria, hard clam, Venus mercenaria, hard-shell clam, quahaug, quahog, round clam - an edible American clam; the heavy shells were used as money by some American Indians
Translations
Венера
Venuše
Venus
VeenusVenus
Venus
Venera
Vénusz
Venus
Venus
Venera
Wenus
Venus
Venera
Венера
Venus
Венера
Sao Kim

Venus

[ˈviːnəs] N (Myth) → Venus f (Astron) → Venus m

Venus

[ˈviːnəs] n
(= planet) → Vénus f
(= goddess) → vénus f

Venus

nVenus f

Venus

[ˈviːnəs] n (Astron, Myth) → Venere f
References in classic literature ?
In one of these barges sat the Queen of that country with her only daughter, a maiden more beautiful than the Day Star, and attended by the ladies of the Court.
The Die Another Day star, 50, spoke out after sci-fi series Doctor Who opted for a female actor in the lead role.
In all honesty, The Empire Strikes Back was the first movie I ever went to see in the theater and to this day Star Wars has played a huge part in my life.
Groundhog Day star Murray, 65, is said to have become annoyed by the camera flashes.
later the Day Star, which was edited by Enoch Jacobs, a Millerite who joined the Shakers at Union Village.
The One Day star can be heard singing an impressive version of I Dreamed A Dream in the teaser.
George Gordon, Day Star and Kawacatoose First Nations have formed a partnership with ATCO Structures and Logistics to build the camp which will house approximately 2,600 mine workers.
Other notable new names include One Day star Jim Sturgess at number 24 and Sherlock actor Benedict Cumberbatch at 33.
Large chunks of the series were filmed on location in Los Angeles and California, and the run features some well-known American stars including Independence Day star Bill Pullman.
The Valentine's Day star has admitted that she and husband Cash Warren were horrified when they discovered 19-month-old Honor Marie was giving one of her friends a hard time during a recent holiday.
Parents can take the Family Day STAR pledge, promising to:
The ex-Liverpool and Match Of The Day star returned from an Easter break to discover his black BMW 750i had been targeted.