day trading

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day trader

n.
A speculator who buys and sells securities on the basis of small short-term price movements.

day trading n.

day trading

n
(Stock Exchange) the practice of buying and selling shares on the same day, often via the internet, in order to make a quick profit
day trader n

day trading

The practice of trading in such a way that all transactions are finished in one trading day and all holdings are liquefied by the end of that day.
Translations
Daytrading
References in periodicals archive ?
Although day traders are familiar with the fundamentals of the market as a way to keep their trading within the larger picture of global economy, their focus lies heavily with technical analysis.
Day traders know this and they can run for cover unlike any other investor.
The company has built custom trading computers for forex traders, stock traders, futures traders, day traders, private equity funds, as well as hedge funds.
Ironically the burst happened on the first day traders were allowed back on their usual pitches, following four months of disruption during the construction of the sewer.
That philosophy goes back to the unemotional, logical approach that all securities professionals, from financial advisers to day traders, preach.
The Japan Day Traders Association, a Tokyo-based nonprofit organization offering lectures on the nuts and bolts of day-trading, has been inundated with people attending the lectures.
This week gave day traders and the more conservative investors plenty of opportunities to buy and offload.
Michael McLain and Wayne Schell regarding the taxation of day traders (see "Day Trading and Self-Employment Taxes," page 80).
Let's look at the difference between day traders, dealers and investors.
Even if Collins is right, and the majority of serious day traders are losing money, it doesn't follow that the state has an interest in protecting the traders from themselves.
These day traders take advantage of very narrow spreads in volatile markets in hopes of garnering short-term profits.