Days of Awe


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Related to Days of Awe: Yom Kippur, Ten Days of Penitence

Days of Awe

pl n
(Judaism) Judaism another name for High Holidays
[a literal translation of YamimNora'im]
References in periodicals archive ?
Admittedly, my Days of Awe were sometimes days of befuddlement, as I tried to figure out where in the prayer book everyone else was, whether an emailed atonement to the ex was less sincere and more a passive aggressive criticism of her motivations for leaving me, and why I was the only person wearing white on Yom Kippur leading to a brief fashion-fret as to whether or not I'd got the days mixed-up.
It marks the end of the Ten Days of Awe that begin during Rosh Hashanah, and includes a twenty-four hour fast that prohibits all food and drink.
Ruins, Days of Awe, and three other books of fiction.
An exciting, cathartic intermingling of rhythms and cultures, Further Definitions of the Days of Awe is spiritual music that calls the heart to dance, and express joy in life and love.
Kevane's final chapter, "The Secret Jews: Days of Awe [Obejas] and A Simple Habana Melody (from when the world was good) [Hijuelos]" also deals with the effects of a specific historical event: early twentieth-century anti-Semitism.
In these days of awe, when the stock market, capital markets and credit markets are in total disarray, there is absolutely no chance that I can be optimistic on the state of the residential condominium market.
Douglas' autobiographical film, "My Days of Awe and Grief," won an award at the Forest Film Festival in Portland.
She focuses on such themes as the violence and miracles of Their Dogs Came with Them by Viramontes and Rechy's The Miraculous Day of Amalia Gomez, Puerto Rican theology in Cofer's The Meaning of Consuelo and Quinonez's Chango's Fire, the liberation theology of Alvarez's In the Time of the Butterflies and Perez's Geographies of Home, and the influence of historical and secret Judaism in Obejas's Days of Awe and Hijuelos's A Simple Habana Melody (from when the world was good.
The Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot) is in complete contrast to the solemnity of the Days of Awe.
Days of Awe, Achy Obejas's second novel and third book of fiction, centers on its Cuban American protagonist's discovery of her family's concealed Jewishness.
Cuban American writer Achy Obejas explores in her most recent novel, Days of Awe (2001), such issues of language, history, memory, and ethnic identity.